Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

IAMP Expresses Support for Disease Control Priorities Project

07.04.2006


The InterAcademy Medical Panel (IAMP), a global network of medical academies and medical divisions of academies of science and engineering, has officially endorsed the goals of the Disease Control Priorities Project (DCPP). The endorsement took place at the conclusion of IAMP’s General Assembly in Beijing, China.



"The DCPP roadmap for improved global health," says Guy de Thé, honorary professor at the Institut Pasteur, Paris, and co-chair of the IAMP executive board, "charts a commonsense approach for addressing the critical public health issues the world now faces." These issues range from the global threat posed by such infectious diseases as HIV/AIDS and avian influenza to the rising number of automobile accidents taking place in cities across the developing world.

DCPP is a collaborative effort of the Fogarty International Center of the U.S. National Institutes of Health, the World Bank, the World Health Organization and the Population Reference Bureau. The project is supported by a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.


"While public health issues are often local and regional in nature," de Thé notes, "their impact can have global ramifications. Rising public concern over the potential risk posed by bird flu indicates that the world is increasingly aware that diseases over ’there’ could soon become diseases over ’here’."

In a statement issued at the conclusion of its General Assembly, IAMP member academies unanimously agreed to lend their support to the DCPP’s core strategies. Specifically, the members of IAMP agreed to help disseminate and communicate the findings of the reports and to encourage governmental officials to pursue – and fund – activities that will help achieve the DCPP goals.

"IAMP members," says David R. Challoner, foreign secretary of the US Institute of Medicine and outgoing IAMP co-chair, "were particularly impressed with two aspects of the DCPP. First, the project focused on health issues of critical importance to the developing world where both the risks and needs are most profound. Second, it proposed solutions that would not cost much money but that could save millions of lives – for example, distributing inexpensive drugs such as aspirin that could substantially reduce the rising incidence of heart attacks in developing countries or teaching mothers how to keep newborn children clean and warm, which could improve the health of babies during the first days of their lives. These are simple measures that carry lifetime benefits."

IAMP members also gave their unanimous support to a second statement outlining the organization’s programmatic agenda for the next three years. They agreed to continue to support IAMP’s Mother-Child Research Network, which was created in 2001, and to launch several new projects, including comprehensive studies of the high incidence of perinatal mortality and rheumatic fever in developing countries. The members also agreed to sponsor efforts to help young researchers, especially in the developing world, to improve their communication and writing skills, and to assess the effectiveness of existing medical networks with agendas that focus on emerging infectious diseases.

"IAMP," notes de Thé, "was created just six years ago. But we hope that our members’ expertise and determination, together with the seriousness of the issues that we deal with, will enable us to have a significant impact on global public health in the years ahead."

Daniel Schaffer | alfa
Further information:
http://www.iamp-online.org/
http://www.ictp.it

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Norovirus evades immune system by hiding out in rare gut cells
12.10.2017 | University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

nachricht Flexible sensors can detect movement in GI tract
11.10.2017 | Massachusetts Institute of Technology

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

Im Focus: New nanomaterial can extract hydrogen fuel from seawater

Hybrid material converts more sunlight and can weather seawater's harsh conditions

It's possible to produce hydrogen to power fuel cells by extracting the gas from seawater, but the electricity required to do it makes the process costly. UCF...

Im Focus: Small collisions make big impact on Mercury's thin atmosphere

Mercury, our smallest planetary neighbor, has very little to call an atmosphere, but it does have a strange weather pattern: morning micro-meteor showers.

Recent modeling along with previously published results from NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft -- short for Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Taking screening methods to the next level

17.10.2017 | Life Sciences

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

‘Find the Lady’ in the quantum world

17.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>