Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

80% of vasectomy patients didn’t complete all-clear semen tests

03.04.2006


A quarter of the men who had vasectomies at a clinic didn’t return for any follow up tests to make sure that the procedure had worked, according to research published in the April issue of the British–based urology journal BJU International.



And only a fifth of the 436 men turned up for both of the tests needed to finally put them in the clear, according to a study carried out by researchers at the Cleveland Clinic Glickman Urological Institute in Ohio, USA.

Of the 75 per cent that did attend their first, eight-week test, a quarter provided samples that still contained sperm. 80 of the 83 men were producing nonmotile (present but inactive) sperm, but three were producing motile (present and active) sperm, including one who was eventually diagnosed with a vasectomy failure.


65 of the 80 men producing nonmotile sperm were clear at their 12-week checks, but six months after their procedure eight men were still producing positive sperm samples. By ten months, all but the vasectomy failure were finally in the clear.

“Our results show that only three-quarters of the men in the study turned up for their eight-week sperm test, which means that a quarter of them had no idea whether the procedure had worked and whether their partner could still fall pregnant” says lead author Dr Nivedita Dhar, Chief Resident in Urology at the Clinic.

“It is impossible to assess the true vasectomy failure rate in the full study sample as many failed to turn up for follow-up tests, despite careful counselling.

“But what concerns us most is that a quarter of the men who had vasectomies did not return for any tests, despite us stressing the important of these follow-ups” adds Dr Dhar.
According to the researchers up to 90 per cent of urologists require two semen samples to confirm sterility and up to 95 per cent request further samples if nonmotile sperm are present. Doctors recommend that couples use additional contraception until vasectomy patients receive the all clear.

“The result of the study are consistent with other research which has estimated that non-compliance among vasectomy patients is between 25 and 40 per cent “ says Dr J Stephen Jones, vice chairman of the Glickman Urological Institute, who directed the study.

“It may, however, be possible to improve full compliance among those who return for at least one test by simplifying the follow-up tests in line with current medical evidence and making sure that this is backed up by adequate counselling.

“For example, our study found that 65 of the men tested at eight weeks needed re-testing, but this fell to 15 when it came to the 12-week test. This suggests that a single test at 12 weeks may be adequate in the majority of cases.

“However, it is very important to stress that couples need to use additional contraception until the vasectomy patient has been given the all clear.”

Annette Whibley | alfa
Further information:
http://www.bjui.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Serious children’s infections also spreading in Switzerland
26.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

nachricht New vaccine production could improve flu shot accuracy
25.07.2017 | Duke University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

CCNY physicists master unexplored electron property

26.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Molecular microscopy illuminates molecular motor motion

26.07.2017 | Life Sciences

Large-Mouthed Fish Was Top Predator After Mass Extinction

26.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>