Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Teacher supervised toothbrushing reduces dental decay in socially deprived school children

17.01.2006


Dental decay is one of the most common preventable health problems in children living in socially deprived areas of the UK. Children living in low-socioeconomic neighbourhoods tend to start brushing their teeth at a later age and use fluoride containing toothpaste less often and, therefore, experience higher levels of dental decay overall. As a result, rates of tooth decay in five-year-olds have not improved in the last 10 years.



A study conducted by scientists from the Oral Health Research Centre, London, and published in Caries Research (1), reported that daily teacher supervised toothbrushing, during school term time only, reduced the occurrence of tooth decay by 11% in 5-year-old children living in a socially deprived region of London, over a period of 21 months.

A total of 370 first year primary school children (aged 5 years) in a London borough completed the study. Half of the children brushed their teeth once a day at school (after lunch but before afternoon lessons) with commercially available fluoride toothpaste under the supervision of their teacher. No supplementary dietary or dental health advice was given to the children or their parents.


A significant overall reduction in tooth decay was reported in all children. Looking solely at those with previous dental decay, the reduction in dental decay becomes even more apparent. A 30% reduction in further dental decay was noted in this group. Greater protection was seen in primary (milk) teeth than in permanent (second) teeth.

This study illustrates the fact that a programme of daily supervised toothbrushing, using fluoridated toothpaste, can be effectively integrated into socially deprived communities to achieve a significant reduction in dental decay in primary school aged children, without any changes to diet. It is well recognised that the introduction and use of fluoridated toothpaste has been the most important factor in the general decline in dental decay in children. Regular toothbrushing with fluoridated toothpaste has a greater impact on dental health than the restriction of sugary foods and beverages (2).

(1) Jackson RJ, Newman HN, Smart GJ, Stokes E, Hogan JI, Brown C, Seres J (2005) The effects of a supervised toothbrushing programme on the caries increment of primary school children, initially aged 5-6 years. Caries Research 39. 108-15.

(2) Gibson S, Williams S (1999) Dental caries in pre-school children: associations with social class, toothbrushing habit and consumption of sugars and sugar-containing foods. Further analysis of data from the National Diet and Nutrition Survey of children aged 1.5-4.5 years. Caries Research 33. 101-13.

(3) Pitts NB, Evans DJ, Nugent ZI (1999) The dental caries experience of 5-year-old children in the . Surveys co-ordinated by the British Association for the Study of Community Dentistry. Community Dental Health 16. 50-56.

Hannah Theobald | alfa
Further information:
http://www.sugar-bureau.co.uk
http://content.karger.com/ProdukteDB/produkte.asp?Aktion=ShowAbstract&ProduktNr=224219&Ausgabe=230677&ArtikelNr=83155

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Researchers release the brakes on the immune system
18.10.2017 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

nachricht Norovirus evades immune system by hiding out in rare gut cells
12.10.2017 | University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Osaka university researchers make the slipperiest surfaces adhesive

18.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

Space radiation won't stop NASA's human exploration

18.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Los Alamos researchers and supercomputers help interpret the latest LIGO findings

18.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>