Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Poor health, poverty and minority status are major factors in depression

30.11.2005


Preliminary results from the STAR-D project, one of the nation’s largest studies of depression, show that chronic depressive episodes are common and are associated with poorer physical health, lower quality of life, socioeconomic disadvantage and minority status.



Findings of this study highlight the common occurrence of chronic episodes of major depression and the range of factors that contribute to them in both psychiatric and primary care settings.

The analysis, which was published in the December issue of the journal Acta Psychiatric Scandinavica, identified baseline socioeconomic and clinical features associated with chronic depression in the first 1,500 participants enrolled in the STAR-D (Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression), a large, multicenter outpatient study that will determine the most effective treatments for major depressive disorder.


Lead author on this preliminary report was William S. Gilmer, M.D., associate professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, medical director of the Asher Center for the Study and Treatment of Depressive Disorders and director of the Behavioral Pharmacology Program at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

Gilmer and colleagues found that 21 percent of the study participants were experiencing chronic major depressive episodes on enrollment in the study.

Chronic episodes were associated with older age, less education, lower income, no private insurance, unemployment, larger number of general medical illnesses, lower physical quality of life, concurrent generalized anxiety disorder, fewer prior episodes of major depression and history of suicide attempts.

African Americans, Hispanics and patients receiving care in primary as opposed to psychiatric care settings experienced more chronicity.

"Clearly, the association of chronic depressions with co-occurring medical illnesses and treatment in primary care settings warrants further exploration," Gilmer said.

Major depressive disorder is a common, usually recurrent and often chronic disorder that causes substantial disability and cost over $40 billion annually.

Although many treatments for depression have been shown to be effective, their actual acceptability, clinical benefit and burden of side effects seen in representative clinical settings are not well known.

Researchers from the Feinberg School; the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center (the National Coordinating Center for the project); the University of Pittsburgh; the University of Kansas School of Medicine; and Massachusetts General Hospital collaborated with Gilmer on this analysis from the STAR-D study.

STAR-D is a seven-year project funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (N01MH90003). Fourteen universities participated as regional centers in the study and enrolled a total of 4,041 patients.

William T. McKinney, M.D., director of the Asher Center, co-directs with Gilmer the STAR-D regional center in Illinois. McKinney is the Norman and Helen Asher Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Feinberg School.

Elizabeth Crown | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.northwestern.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Tracking movement of immune cells identifies key first steps in inflammatory arthritis
23.01.2017 | Massachusetts General Hospital

nachricht Team discovers how bacteria exploit a chink in the body's armor
20.01.2017 | University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Quantum optical sensor for the first time tested in space – with a laser system from Berlin

For the first time ever, a cloud of ultra-cold atoms has been successfully created in space on board of a sounding rocket. The MAIUS mission demonstrates that quantum optical sensors can be operated even in harsh environments like space – a prerequi-site for finding answers to the most challenging questions of fundamental physics and an important innovation driver for everyday applications.

According to Albert Einstein's Equivalence Principle, all bodies are accelerated at the same rate by the Earth's gravity, regardless of their properties. This...

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Tracking movement of immune cells identifies key first steps in inflammatory arthritis

23.01.2017 | Health and Medicine

Electrocatalysis can advance green transition

23.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New technology for mass-production of complex molded composite components

23.01.2017 | Process Engineering

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>