Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Phenolic compounds may explain Mediterranean diet benefits

10.11.2005


Blood vessels appear healthier after people consume olive oil high in phenolic compounds



Phenolic compounds in olive oil, which have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-clotting properties, may explain cardiovascular health benefits associated with the so-called Mediterranean Diet, according to a new study in the Nov. 15, 2005, issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

"It could be that the beneficial effect of the Mediterranean diet on cardiovascular disease and arteriosclerosis depends on the synergistic effects of the different nutrients that constitute complete foods and, as an example, virgin olive oil is more than fat because it is a real juice with other healthy micronutrients," said Francisco Pérez Jiménez, M.D., Ph.D., from the Reina Sofia University Hospital in Córdoba, Spain.


The researchers, including lead author Juan Ruano, M.D., Ph.D., fed breakfasts including olive oil (that was either high or low in phenolic content) to 21 study participants (5 men, 16 women) who had high cholesterol levels, but were otherwise apparently healthy. The functioning of the endothelium (the inner lining) of small blood vessels of the fingers (instead of "in the arms") of participants and the concentrations of certain components in blood serum, including nitric oxide, improved after the polyphenol-rich breakfast.

"This is the first study that shows a direct benefit of an olive oil with high content in phenolic compounds on endothelial function in vivo," Dr. Pérez Jiménez said.

After fasting overnight, the participants reported to the hospital, where they ate a breakfast of 60 grams of white bread with 40 milliliters of virgin olive oil, a relatively high-fat meal. The meals also included vitamin A supplementation. Over the next four hours, blood samples were taken and the researchers used Doppler laser to measure endothelial responses to sudden changes in blood flow, which were produced by inflating and then deflating a blood pressure cuff. The response is known as ischemic reactive hyperemia. Poor responsiveness to this sort of blood flow test is considered an early warning sign of cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have linked high-fat meals to poor endothelial function lasting for several hours after eating.

In order to focus on the role of phenolic compounds, the researchers put each participant through the process twice in a randomized order, once using olive oil naturally high in phenolic compounds (400 parts per million) and once with the same brand of olive oil that had been processed to remove most of the phenolic compounds (80 parts per million remaining).

"We think, looking at our results, that the reduction in oxidative stress and the increase in the nitric oxide bioavailability are behind the observed improvement in ischemic reactive hyperemia," Dr. Pérez Jiménez said.

Dr. Pérez Jiménez said that olive oil may be superior to seed oils because it is a natural juice, pressed from the olives, so it does not go through the type of processing needed to extract oil from seeds, such as sunflowers, soybeans and rapeseeds. Nevertheless, he said further studies should be done to investigate whether phenolic compounds in olive oil can be linked to improved health outcomes.

"Although our study shows a direct benefit of an olive oil with high content in phenolic compounds on endothelial function in humans, carefully controlled studies in appropriate populations, or with a large sample size, are required to definitively establish the in vivo antioxidant properties of these components in relation to cardiovascular disease outcomes. On the other hand, some data suggest that endothelial dysfunction could be a surrogate end point for prediction of cardiovascular risk, but we need more information on the utility of the different methods to evaluate endothelial dysfunction," Dr. Pérez Jiménez said.

Robert F. Wilson, M.D., from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, who was not connected with this study, noted that health benefits of a Mediterranean diet were described over 50 years ago.

"This study demonstrates one possible mechanism by which olive oil rich in phenolic substances improves the functioning of the circulation. The authors found that after test subjects took olive oil spiked with phenolic compounds, their blood vessels could dilate better, which could improve blood flow. These findings are particularly interesting because similar studies after high fat meals, like a burger and fries, showed impairment of normal blood vessel functions," Dr. Wilson said.

Dr. Wilson pointed out that not all olive oils have a high phenolic content.

"So these results might not be true for all olive oil on the shelf at the grocery store," he said.

Juan J. Badimon, Ph.D., F.A.C.C., from the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York, New York, who also was not connected with this study, said it was well-designed and will help address controversy about whether olive oil benefits or impairs blood vessel health.

"One of the beauties of this study is that using a randomized, sequential, crossover study, so that the same patients were exposed to the same oil, once with low phenolic content and the other with high phenolic content, the only variable in this study is the phenolic content of the olive oil," Dr. Badimon noted. "These results indicate that a very small change in diet, like using olive oil with a high phenolic content may have a significant impact in the progression of atherosclerosis."

Amy Murphy | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.acc.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht NTU scientists build new ultrasound device using 3-D printing technology
07.12.2016 | Nanyang Technological University

nachricht How to turn white fat brown
07.12.2016 | University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Significantly more productivity in USP lasers

In recent years, lasers with ultrashort pulses (USP) down to the femtosecond range have become established on an industrial scale. They could advance some applications with the much-lauded “cold ablation” – if that meant they would then achieve more throughput. A new generation of process engineering that will address this issue in particular will be discussed at the “4th UKP Workshop – Ultrafast Laser Technology” in April 2017.

Even back in the 1990s, scientists were comparing materials processing with nanosecond, picosecond and femtosesecond pulses. The result was surprising:...

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

NTU scientists build new ultrasound device using 3-D printing technology

07.12.2016 | Health and Medicine

The balancing act: An enzyme that links endocytosis to membrane recycling

07.12.2016 | Life Sciences

How to turn white fat brown

07.12.2016 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>