Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Exercise vital to build strong bones

20.10.2005


’Move it or Lose it’ starts three-year lifestyle campaign to fight osteoporosis

Exercise can help reduce the risk of osteoporosis and related fractures, a new report explains. "One of the best ways to build and maintain healthy bones is through exercise," noted Professor Helmut Minne, IOF Board member and author of Move it or Lose it: How exercise helps to build and maintain strong bones, prevent falls and fractures and speed rehabilitation.

The report was issued at a press event in Berlin, Germany by International Osteoporosis Foundation-IOF to mark World Osteoporosis Day – WOD 2005. The launch took place during a press event organized by the Nationale Initiative gegen Osteoporose, a consortium of leading organizations and people fighting osteoporosis in the country.



"This year’s World Osteoporosis Day theme is the role of exercise, the first of a three-year ’lifestyle’ campaign," noted IOF Chief Executive Officer Daniel Navid. "We hope that our positive message will encourage women and men to realize that they can take responsibility for their bone health and not be victims of osteoporosis later in life,"

Osteoporosis, in which the bones become fragile and break easily, is one of the world’s most devastating and common chronic diseases. It strikes one in three women over 50 worldwide (more than breast cancer) and one in five men (more than prostate cancer).

Some highlights of the Move it or Lose it report, which will be distributed by IOF’s member osteoporosis societies in some 80 countries:

  • Because bone is living tissue, which renews itself continuously, it requires regular stimulation from physical activity. Like muscles, bones should be used regularly or they will deteriorate.
  • In girls, the bone tissue accumulated during the ages of 11-13 approximately equals the amount lost during the 30 years following menopause.
  • One study in Finland shows that the most physically active young girls gain about 40% more bone mass than the least active girls of the same age. Similar, but less dramatic, results were recorded for boys in a United States survey.
  • Exercising your back during middle-age can help prevent your vertebrae from weakening or fracturing when you get older.
  • Exercise also helps balance and prevents falls – this is important bcause every year, some two out of five people over 65 will fall at least once. Falls are a leading cause of fracture.
  • Women who sit for more than nine hours a day are more likely to have a hip fracture.
  • Following fracture, exercise can help to prevent further fractures, relieve pain and help maintain quality of life.
  • Weight bearing and high impact exercise (dancing, walking, jogging, sports, strength training) is required to stimulate bone formation.

Other World Osteoporosis Day materials released today include:

Un Cuerpo Sano/A Healthy Body – Osteoporosis song

Recognizing that dancing is a fun and effective way to build bones, IOF has commissioned the world’s first Latin-beat osteoporosis song, Un Cuerpo Sano/A Healthy Body.

The song was written and performed by Erika Ender, a leading pop singer who donated her creative energy to this project. She has recorded the song in Spanish and English versions.

An accompanying music video featuring Erika Ender has been produced by leading Miami-based film director Felipe Nino.

Public Service Announcements

Today IOF released a new series of eight Public Service Announcements in which world-famous personalities urged people to take charge of their own bone health and avoid osteoporosis:

These celebrities include:

o Paolo Rossi. Italy. Football player
o Julie Payette. Canada. Astronaut
o Erika Ender. Panama/Brazil. Singer/songwriter
o Pilin Leon. Venezuela. Miss World 1981
o Belinda Green. Australia. Miss World 1972
o Kirk Pengilly. Australia. Singer, band INXS
o Mark Holden. Australia. Singer
o Trudie Goodwin. UK. Actress
o Wojtek Czyz. Germany. Para-Olympian
o Prof. Rita Süssmuth. Germany. Former President of the Deutscher Bundestag

World Osteoporosis Day 2006 Theme

IOF also announced today that the theme for World Osteoporosis Day 2006 will be "Bone Appetit", the role of food and nutrition in building strong bones.

Janice Blondeau | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.osteofound.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Organ-on-a-chip mimics heart's biomechanical properties
23.02.2017 | Vanderbilt University

nachricht Researchers identify cause of hereditary skeletal muscle disorder
22.02.2017 | Klinikum der Universität München

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>