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Sunderland researchers discover major breakthrough in anti-ageing industry

07.10.2005


Research at the University of Sunderland looks to have led to a major breakthrough in the multi-billion pound anti-ageing industry.



A new device called Restorelite is having a dramatic effect on those battling against the ageing process, with initial trials leading to a success rate of around 90 per cent.

Industry standard double blind trials should be completed in December, and if the results are as good as expected the £45 machines could be on high street shelves as early as next year.


The device, which reduces wrinkles and takes away bags, was discovered by chance after research at the University of Sunderland’s School of Health, Natural and Social Sciences.

The makers of Restorelite also have a product called Virulite, which uses a narrow bandwidth of infra red to treat cold sores twice as fast as other treatements.

Academics at Sunderland were asked to investigate how the infra red light delivered by the Virulite machine actually worked. By chance, they found that a certain wavelength of infra red kept white blood cells alive in adverse environmental conditions.

They also found that this wavelength protected against UV, which is a major contributor to the ageing process. Based on this discovery the Restorelite machine was produced.

Dr Gordon Dougal, who devised the Virulite and Restorelite technology, said: “As a direct result of the research at Sunderland we devised Restorelite. Initial tests have been very positive.

“We took before and after photographs after a three month period. Around 90 per cent of those involved in the trial gave a positive response. Evidence so far shows if someone 55-years–old uses the machine over two to three months it could take around five years off them.

“Despite some people saying otherwise, nothing can halt the ageing process. However, Restorelite does slow it down quite a lot. No product or technology currently on the market keeps white cells alive. Restorelite not only does this, but improves the immune cells.

“Without the intuition and innovation of the researchers at Sunderland I don’t think we would have achieved what we have.”

Pauline Lee, 52, from Spenymoor, County Durham and Jan Fulford, 47, from Newton Aycliffe both use Restorelite.

Pauline says: “I have been using it for over a year. I noticed a difference in the first couple of months. It has smoothed the skin and reduced the wrinkles around my eyes. It’s painless and only takes nine minutes an eye. I would certainly recommend it.”

Jan said: “I was interested to use Restorelite as a lady of my age starts to feel the passage of time. I saw good results quite quickly.

“I had a noticeable bag under one eye which has almost gone. I am also losing some wrinkles that had appeared around my mouth. I too would recommend the treatment – it has certainly done something for me.“

Restorelite is currently available online from www.Restorelite.co.uk

Tony Kerr | alfa
Further information:
http://www.sunderland.ac.uk/caffairs/septhm.htm
http://www.Restorelite.co.uk

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