Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Nerve changes from diabetes begin earlier than previously known

30.09.2005


Mayo Clinic research reinforces the importance of blood sugar control from onset of diabetes to prevent nerve damage later



Mayo Clinic researchers have found that subtle change in nerve conduction is the first reliable sign of nerve complications from diabetes and that this change can be measured long before other symptoms or signs of nerve damage develop.

"We’ve found what we believe is the earliest sign of nerve change due to diabetes," says Peter J. Dyck, M.D., Mayo Clinic neurologist and lead researcher on the study. Results were published in the September issue of Diabetes Care. "Changes begin much earlier than previously demonstrated," he says.


About 500 patients from Olmsted County, Minn., home to Mayo Clinic, participated in the longitudinal study, many for 20 years. Patients agreed to periodic measures of their diabetes and measurement of nerve, eye, kidney and blood vessel complications.

About half the people with diabetes develop some type of nerve damage (neuropathy) caused indirectly by high blood sugar levels. Symptoms can include pain, asleep-type numbness, tingling, burning and loss of feeling. Serious complications can include foot ulcers, gangrene, amputations, blindness and kidney failure.

In the study, researchers used various techniques to measure nerve changes, including patient exams, reflex and strength tests, and nerve conduction tests, which measure how quickly nerves carry electrical signals. The nerve conduction tests, over time, provided the most consistent and reliable measures of early nerve damage due to diabetes.

"Even when patients had nerve conduction values well within the normal range, our serial assessments showed steady, unequivocal and statistically significant worsening," says Dr. Dyck.

The nerve conduction measures were corrected for variations in patients’ age, height and weight that could have affected results.

The study focused especially on 90 patients who at first evaluation did not have nerve damage and who had been evaluated at least six times at annual or biannual intervals. The Mayo investigators then tested which measure of neuropathy (nerve conductions, symptoms, neurologic signs, quantitative sensation tests or quantitative autonomic tests) significantly worsened, improved or remained unchanged over the study period. Of the five tests, only nerve conduction showed an unequivocal, highly significant, steady worsening over time.

Dr. Dyck says the study offers insights for diabetes care and future research on treatment.

"The aim should be to prevent neuropathy and the complications of eyes and kidneys rather than to intervene after they develop," says Dr. Dyck. Other studies have shown that rigorous control of blood sugar may prevent and possibly even reverse nerve, eye and kidney complications for people with diabetes.

About 18 million Americans have diabetes. From 60 to 70 percent of people with diabetes develop some type of neuropathy or nerve damage due to the disease, according to the American Diabetes Association. Assuming that no symptoms means good news is dangerous, according to Dr. Dyck. "The study shows that diabetes is insidious from the beginning," he says. Diabetes is like atherosclerosis and hypertension, which develop insidiously and continuously unless controlled. Later, they may result in such severe problems as strokes, heart attacks and gangrene of the feet and legs.

Mayo Clinic research results could also influence the design of future clinical trials on treatment options for diabetes. Because nerve changes begin so early, Dr. Dyck says it will be important for clinical trials to include less severely affected patients and to perform studies over longer periods.

Lisa Lucier | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.mayo.edu
http://www.mayoclinic.com

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht How cancer metastasis happens: Researchers reveal a key mechanism
19.01.2018 | Weill Cornell Medicine

nachricht Researchers identify new way to unmask melanoma cells to the immune system
17.01.2018 | Duke University Medical Center

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Artificial agent designs quantum experiments

On the way to an intelligent laboratory, physicists from Innsbruck and Vienna present an artificial agent that autonomously designs quantum experiments. In initial experiments, the system has independently (re)discovered experimental techniques that are nowadays standard in modern quantum optical laboratories. This shows how machines could play a more creative role in research in the future.

We carry smartphones in our pockets, the streets are dotted with semi-autonomous cars, but in the research laboratory experiments are still being designed by...

Im Focus: Scientists decipher key principle behind reaction of metalloenzymes

So-called pre-distorted states accelerate photochemical reactions too

What enables electrons to be transferred swiftly, for example during photosynthesis? An interdisciplinary team of researchers has worked out the details of how...

Im Focus: The first precise measurement of a single molecule's effective charge

For the first time, scientists have precisely measured the effective electrical charge of a single molecule in solution. This fundamental insight of an SNSF Professor could also pave the way for future medical diagnostics.

Electrical charge is one of the key properties that allows molecules to interact. Life itself depends on this phenomenon: many biological processes involve...

Im Focus: Paradigm shift in Paris: Encouraging an holistic view of laser machining

At the JEC World Composite Show in Paris in March 2018, the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT will be focusing on the latest trends and innovations in laser machining of composites. Among other things, researchers at the booth shared with the Aachen Center for Integrative Lightweight Production (AZL) will demonstrate how lasers can be used for joining, structuring, cutting and drilling composite materials.

No other industry has attracted as much public attention to composite materials as the automotive industry, which along with the aerospace industry is a driver...

Im Focus: Room-temperature multiferroic thin films and their properties

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Tohoku University have developed high-quality GFO epitaxial films and systematically investigated their ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties. They also demonstrated the room-temperature magnetocapacitance effects of these GFO thin films.

Multiferroic materials show magnetically driven ferroelectricity. They are attracting increasing attention because of their fascinating properties such as...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

10th International Symposium: “Advanced Battery Power – Kraftwerk Batterie” Münster, 10-11 April 2018

08.01.2018 | Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Let the good tubes roll

19.01.2018 | Materials Sciences

How cancer metastasis happens: Researchers reveal a key mechanism

19.01.2018 | Health and Medicine

Meteoritic stardust unlocks timing of supernova dust formation

19.01.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>