Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Healthcare workers who don’t have flu injections could be risking patients’ lives

19.09.2005


Low flu vaccination rates among healthcare workers could be risking the lives of frail elderly patients and increasing winter pressures in UK hospitals, according to research published in the latest issue of Journal of Clinical Nursing.



Less than eight per cent of nurses and healthcare assistants surveyed in two Liverpool hospitals said they had annual flu injections.

29 per cent of the 144 healthcare workers who took part in the study said they didn’t feel they needed to be vaccinated, 18 per cent were not aware of the vaccine and 11 per cent were concerned about the side effects.


“Vaccinating healthcare workers against flu can reduce staff sickness and winter pressures as well as reducing deaths among frail older patients” says Dr Helen Canning, who carried out her research at the University of Liverpool.

“Our study found that the main reason for poor vaccine uptake was a basic lack of knowledge and understanding of the vaccine, especially regarding benefits and side-effects.

“Many of the respondents appeared to demonstrate general apathy towards the flu vaccination.

“Almost half of the respondents were either not aware of the vaccine or did not think they needed it. And only 10 per cent knew that the benefits of the vaccine included protecting patients against the serious complications of flu.

“One encouraging finding from our study was that half of those who had not been vaccinated stated that they might be influenced to have the vaccine in future.”

The findings were cross checked with figures from the Occupational Health Departments of the two hospitals. These showed that just over 10 per cent of hospital staff, including administration and clerical staff, had been vaccinated during the period surveyed.

Dr Canning and her co-researchers - Dr Jennifer Phillips and Specialist Registrar Stephen Allsup – also looked at sick leave rates among the respondents.

They found that in the three months before the survey more than 51 per cent of respondents had taken sick leave because of a flu-like illness.

“If the vaccine uptake had been more widespread, illnesses due to the influenza virus could have been prevented” says Dr Canning. “This illness prevention, if repeated in all hospitals nationwide, could have a significant impact on ward staffing issues during the busy winter months when the incidence of flu is greatest.”

Annette Whibley | alfa
Further information:
http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/jcn

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Chances to treat childhood dementia
24.07.2017 | Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg

nachricht World first: Massive thrombosis removed during early pregnancy
20.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Ultrathin device harvests electricity from human motion

24.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Scientists announce the quest for high-index materials

24.07.2017 | Materials Sciences

ADIR Project: Lasers Recover Valuable Materials

24.07.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>