Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Telemonitoring of multiple vital parameters in chronic heart failure

06.09.2005


Chronic heart failure (CHF) is a frequent syndrome with an increasing prevalence. It is a frequent cause of impeding symptoms, has a negative prognosis and absorbs about two percent of the budgets of health-care systems in the industrialized nations.



Optimal management of patients with chronic heart failure has to detect emerging symptoms of a beginning hemodynamic imbalance in time and to administer an appropriate therapy in order to avoid decompensation and hospital admission. Telemonitoring of physiological and clinical parameters supplies valuable information to improve health care of these patients.

The TeleMedical Centre of Brandenburg provides continuous telemonitoring of multiple disease-relevant parameters to 40 patients since more than 1 year. A user-friendly home based electronic device registers weight, blood pressure, heart rate and rhythm by means of ECG, ventilation frequency and oxygen saturation of the blood. In addition, the patient uses a schematic code to enter details on his subjective state of health, changes of medication and an optional contact request. Once per day the information is sent via e-mail to the Telemedical Centre where it is evaluated. If the critical limits of individually defined parameters are crossed the primary care provider is promptly notified by fax. So treatment can be adjusted before heartfailure deteriorates and hospital admissions becomes necessary.


Feasibility and effectiveness of the continuous telemonitoring of multiple disease-relevant parameters were evaluated. Patients with CHF (NYHA III-IV) with at least one hospital admission due to acute decompensation within in the preceding year were enrolled in our study. After receiving an in hospital optimum treatment telemonitoring was started immediately after discharge. Patients were supplied with a Telemonitoring System in order to record the above described multiple parameters daily. Data were monitored daily and assessed by specialized physicians whether defined thresholds values were exceeded. An information about imminent hemodynamic imbalance was immediately sent to the responsible general practitioner by fax-transmission.

Forty patients (32 men, 8 women) with a mean age was 65 plus or minus 10,5 years (men 64 plus or minus 10, women 67 plus or minus 10,5) participated. Etiology of CHF was coronary heart disease, cardiomyopathie, hypertension and others. Total number of data-transmissions was 9686. Practitioners were informed about imminent hemodynamic imbalance because of weight gain, sudden changes in heart rhythm (paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, bradycardia, non sustaining VT) or patients assessment of critical symptoms. A change of therapy and stabilization of hemodynamic imbalance without re-admission to hospital could be observed in the majority of cases. Patients reported about a gain in the feeling of security and possibility to manage their severe disease.

Telemonitoring of multiple vital parameters of patients with chronic heart disease is feasible. Even elder patients can handle a well designed modern technological device. Symptoms of hemodynamic imbalance can be registered in time and responsible practitioners respond to urgently transmitted information. Health care of patients with chronic heart failure can be improved and hospital re-admissions can be avoided. Further investigations are necessary to determine effects of continuous telemonitoring of multiple disease-relevant parameters on long time prognosis and mortality.

Gina Dellios | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.escardio.es

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Serious children’s infections also spreading in Switzerland
26.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

nachricht New vaccine production could improve flu shot accuracy
25.07.2017 | Duke University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Serious children’s infections also spreading in Switzerland

26.07.2017 | Health and Medicine

Biomarkers for identifying Tumor Aggressiveness

26.07.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>