Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New dye could offer early test for Alzheimer’s

26.08.2005


MIT technique is noninvasive



MIT scientists have developed a new dye that could offer noninvasive early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, a discovery that could aid in monitoring the progression of the disease and in studying the efficacy of new treatments to stop it.
The work will be published in the Aug. 26 issue of Angewandte Chemie.

Today, doctors can only make a definitive diagnosis of Alzheimer’s-currently the fourth-leading cause of death in the United States-through a postmortem autopsy of the brain. "Before you can cure Alzheimer’s, you have to be able to diagnose it and monitor its progress very precisely," said Timothy Swager, leader of the work and a professor in MIT’s Department of Chemistry. "Otherwise it’s hard to know whether a new treatment is working or not."



To that end, Swager and postdoctoral associate Evgueni Nesterov, also from the MIT Department of Chemistry, worked with researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital and the University of Pittsburgh to develop a contrast agent that would first bind to the protein deposits, or plaques, in the brain that cause Alzheimer’s, and then fluoresce when exposed to radiation in the near-infrared range. The new dye could allow direct imaging of Alzheimer’s plaques through a patient’s skull.

Some of the first noninvasive techniques for diagnosing Alzheimer’s involved agents labeled with radioactive elements that could enter the brain and target disease plaque for imaging with positron emission tomography (PET). However, these methods were expensive and limited by the short working lifetime of the labeled agents.

Swager and colleagues developed the new dye, called NIAD-4, through a targeted design process based on a set of specific requirements, including the ability to enter the brain rapidly upon injection, bind to amyloid plaques, absorb and fluoresce radiation in the right spectral range, and provide sharp contrast between the plaques and the surrounding tissue. The compound provided clear visual images of amyloid brain plaques in living mice with specially prepared cranial windows.

To make the technique truly noninvasive, scientists must further refine the dye so it fluoresces at a slightly longer wavelength, closer to the infrared region. Light in the near-IR range can penetrate living tissue well enough to make brain structures visible. Swager likens the effect to the translucence produced when one holds a red laser pointer against the side of a finger.

"This procedure could be done in a chamber with a photodetector and a bunch of lasers, and it would be painless," he said, adding that infrared fluorescence and other optical techniques will lead to a whole new class of noninvasive medical diagnostics. Swager says fluorescing dyes like NIAD-4 could be ready for clinical trials in the near future.

"What we have is a dye that lights up when it binds to amyloids that form in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s. It’s a completely new transduction scheme-a way of translating a physical or chemical event that’s invisible to the naked eye, into a recognizable signal. Further wavelength adjustments in these dyes will allow us to perform in vivo analysis through human tissue."

The new dye was developed as part of a broader effort in sensing technology at MIT’s Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies. In addition to its applications as a medical diagnostic, Swager says fluorescing dyes like NIAD-4 could work as signals in a wide variety of sensing schemes.

Eve Downing | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.mit.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht 3D images of cancer cells in the body: Medical physicists from Halle present new method
16.05.2018 | Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg

nachricht Better equipped in the fight against lung cancer
16.05.2018 | Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Explanation for puzzling quantum oscillations has been found

So-called quantum many-body scars allow quantum systems to stay out of equilibrium much longer, explaining experiment | Study published in Nature Physics

Recently, researchers from Harvard and MIT succeeded in trapping a record 53 atoms and individually controlling their quantum state, realizing what is called a...

Im Focus: Dozens of binaries from Milky Way's globular clusters could be detectable by LISA

Next-generation gravitational wave detector in space will complement LIGO on Earth

The historic first detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes far outside our galaxy opened a new window to understanding the universe. A...

Im Focus: Entangled atoms shine in unison

A team led by Austrian experimental physicist Rainer Blatt has succeeded in characterizing the quantum entanglement of two spatially separated atoms by observing their light emission. This fundamental demonstration could lead to the development of highly sensitive optical gradiometers for the precise measurement of the gravitational field or the earth's magnetic field.

The age of quantum technology has long been heralded. Decades of research into the quantum world have led to the development of methods that make it possible...

Im Focus: Computer-Designed Customized Regenerative Heart Valves

Cardiovascular tissue engineering aims to treat heart disease with prostheses that grow and regenerate. Now, researchers from the University of Zurich, the Technical University Eindhoven and the Charité Berlin have successfully implanted regenerative heart valves, designed with the aid of computer simulations, into sheep for the first time.

Producing living tissue or organs based on human cells is one of the main research fields in regenerative medicine. Tissue engineering, which involves growing...

Im Focus: Light-induced superconductivity under high pressure

A team of scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg investigated optically-induced superconductivity in the alkali-doped fulleride K3C60under high external pressures. This study allowed, on one hand, to uniquely assess the nature of the transient state as a superconducting phase. In addition, it unveiled the possibility to induce superconductivity in K3C60 at temperatures far above the -170 degrees Celsius hypothesized previously, and rather all the way to room temperature. The paper by Cantaluppi et al has been published in Nature Physics.

Unlike ordinary metals, superconductors have the unique capability of transporting electrical currents without any loss. Nowadays, their technological...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Save the date: Forum European Neuroscience – 07-11 July 2018 in Berlin, Germany

02.05.2018 | Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Supersonic waves may help electronics beat the heat

18.05.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Keeping a Close Eye on Ice Loss

18.05.2018 | Information Technology

CrowdWater: An App for Flood Research

18.05.2018 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>