Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Low colon cancer screening rates leaves a million New Yorkers at risk

25.07.2005


Half of New York City residents over 50, the age at which the American Cancer Society recommends beginning screening tests, have not received a colon cancer-screening test within the recommended time intervals, according to a new study. The report, published in the September 1, 2005 issue of CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, says those New Yorkers least likely to have received screening include those with low-income, the uninsured, Asians and current smokers.



More than 56,000 Americans are expected to die this year from colorectal cancer, making it the third leading cause of cancer death in both men and women. Screening tests, which include the fecal occult blood test (FOBT), flexible sigmoidoscopy (FS), and colonoscopy, have been proven to reduce mortality and be more cost-effective than breast cancer screening tests, which are more widely used. Current screening guidelines recommend annual FOBT, FS every 5 years, or a colonoscopy every 10 years, but only 53 percent of Americans receive timely screening.

New York City is unique in that there is high density of gastroenterologists and endoscopy labs to provide access to colonoscopy services. In 2003, the city adopted new screening guidelines--a colonoscopy every 10 years or FOBT every year as an acceptable, although not optimal, alternative for those unwilling or unable to undergo colonoscopy. To evaluate the effect of this change, Lorna Thorpe, Ph.D. of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and researchers from leading hospitals and academic institutions conducted a baseline telephone survey of the colon cancer screening habits of 9,802 New York City residents.


Only 55 percent of the 3606 New York City adults age 50 and older reported a recent colorectal cancer screening test within the time interval recommended by national guidelines. Forty-two percent of those received a colonoscopy, while 32 percent received a FOBT and 10 percent received FS, respectively.

Analysis showed that men were more likely than women to have received either colonoscopy or FS. Also, men age 65 and older were significantly more likely to have a colonoscopy than younger men. Non-Hispanic African-Americans and women were less likely to receive colonoscopies, having higher rates of FOBT use instead. The lower uptake of colonoscopy among non-Hispanic African-Americans was of particular concern, given the high rates of colon cancer mortality in this population in New York City. Asians--women in particular--were the racial group least likely to have undergone a timely screening test. In addition, smoking, low-income and lack of health insurance were each associated with a decreased likelihood of having had a recent screening test. In contrast, those who utilized preventive care, such as receiving annual flu shots, were more likely to have a screening test within the recommended time interval.

Dr. Thorpe and her colleagues conclude, "nearly half of New Yorkers ages 50 and older are not undergoing screening within the recommended schedule." They add, "Resources and interventions designed to increase screening practices, particularly colonoscopy, will need to target poor and uninsured communities."

Amy Molnar | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.wiley.com

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Second cause of hidden hearing loss identified
20.02.2017 | Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

nachricht Prospect for more effective treatment of nerve pain
20.02.2017 | Universität Zürich

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Switched-on DNA

20.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Second cause of hidden hearing loss identified

20.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

Prospect for more effective treatment of nerve pain

20.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>