Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Mayo Clinic Finds Kidney Disease Associated with "Benign" Prostate Obstruction

30.06.2005


Men who experience signs and symptoms of a prostate obstruction resulting from benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) are three times more likely than other men to develop chronic kidney disease, according to findings of a Mayo Clinic study published in this month’s edition of Kidney International.



"This is the first study on the topic to sample the general community," says Andrew Rule, M.D., the Mayo Clinic kidney specialist who conducted the study with epidemiologist Steven Jacobsen, M.D., Ph.D.

"Symptomatic and non-symptomatic men were compared, unlike clinical trials and studies in a urology practice, which tend to represent only symptomatic men."


BPH and chronic kidney disease pose significant health problems in older men. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) occurs when the kidneys cannot rid metabolic wastes from the body or maintain the proper fluid and chemical balances. Eventually, the waste builds up and becomes poisonous to the body. Kidney disease can develop rapidly -- in two to three months -- or gradually over decades.

Many risks coincide with the development of CKD. "Several studies show men with chronic kidney disease have increased chance of death, hospitalization and cardiovascular events," says Dr. Rule.

The prostate gland is located just below a male’s bladder and surrounds the top portion of the urethra, the tube that drains urine from the bladder. "Growth of the prostate gland can lead to a bladder outlet obstruction," says Dr. Rule. "An obstruction of the bladder can cause inability to or discomfort in emptying the bladder, a slowed stream of urine, frequent urges to void during the night or an enlarged, damaged bladder."

"We were surprised at how much kidney disease can be attributed to BPH," says Dr. Jacobsen. "An obstruction on the urethra is like a dam on a river -- men can still void, but the constant buildup and pressure will ultimately cause damage." BPH affects about half of men in their 60s and up to 90 percent of men in their 70s and 80s. It is not related to the development of prostate cancer, although causes of BPH tissue growth inside the prostate later in life is unclear. Researchers believe that with age the prostate becomes more susceptible to the effects of hormones, including testosterone.

The most effective way to treat CKD is to care for and manage the underlying disease. "It has been shown that many patients with kidney disease respond to surgical treatments of BPH," says Dr. Rule. "There are also medications to relieve obstructions, by either shrinking the prostate gland or relaxing muscles that contribute to the obstruction."

The recent study surveyed 476 white men, ages 40-79, randomly selected from Olmsted County, Minn. Eventually, the researchers would like to see if similar findings are reproduced among general populations studied at other research centers. Dr. Jacobsen also suggests further research and testing to determine if treating BPH reverses the progression of kidney disease.

Ultimately, the researchers hope the results of the study will encourage both physicians and patients to consider BPH as a factor in kidney disease. "Men with diagnosed BPH may need to be screened to see if this condition is causing kidney damage," says Dr. Jacobsen.

Lisa Lucier | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.mayo.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht On track to heal leukaemia
18.01.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

nachricht Penn vet research identifies new target for taming Ebola
12.01.2017 | University of Pennsylvania

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

Im Focus: How to inflate a hardened concrete shell with a weight of 80 t

At TU Wien, an alternative for resource intensive formwork for the construction of concrete domes was developed. It is now used in a test dome for the Austrian Federal Railways Infrastructure (ÖBB Infrastruktur).

Concrete shells are efficient structures, but not very resource efficient. The formwork for the construction of concrete domes alone requires a high amount of...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

Nothing will happen without batteries making it happen!

05.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A big nano boost for solar cells

18.01.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Glass's off-kilter harmonies

18.01.2017 | Materials Sciences

Toward a 'smart' patch that automatically delivers insulin when needed

18.01.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>