Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Rheumatoid arthritis patients are more at risk of coronary artery disease


Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at increased risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) compared with individuals who suffer from CAD but not RA. The findings of research published today in Arthritis Research & Therapy show that CAD is accelerated in RA patients, and patients with both RA and CAD are at an increased risk of death from heart disease. The authors of the study suggest that the high numbers of inflammatory T cells found in RA arthritis patients may cause the increased risk of CAD. Importantly, this increased risk results in a trend towards increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease for patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

The risk of cardiovascular diseases is higher in patients with RA. It is known that the processes leading to the chronic inflammation and autoimmune response seen in RA share features with those involved in atherosclerosis. Because of this, RA patients could be predisposed to CAD. Several studies have already shown an increased risk of atherosclerosis and heart attacks in patients with RA. Despite this knowledge, data is lacking on how high that risk is.

Kenneth Warrington and colleagues, from the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota, conducted a study of residents in Olmsted County, Minnesota, USA, with RA and new-onset CAD. These patients were compared to a control group of patients with newly diagnosed CAD. The two groups were then matched for age, sex and cardiovascular risk factors including diabetes, high blood pressure and smoking. For patients in both groups, the results of the first coronary angiogram – an x-ray image of blood vessels used to identify the exact location and severity of CAD – were examined.

The authors found that patients with RA have more advanced coronary atherosclerosis at the time of CAD diagnosis compared with patients without RA. This occurs independently of the presence or absence of other cardiovascular risk factors. This trend was mirrored in a trend towards increased frequency of cardiovascular death in RA patients. The risk of cardiovascular death in patients with RA and CAD was approximately twice that of the control group.

According to the study’s authors “the rheumatoid disease process itself likely contributes to accelerated coronary artery disease”. Complications from atherosclerosis occur when an inflammatory lesion of T cells and other white blood cells accumulate in the inner layers of arteries. Elevated levels of a particular type of T cells, CD4+CD28- T cells, are seen in RA patients, where these cells play a central role in inflammation of the joints and disease progression.

This study demonstrates that, irrespective of other cardiovascular risk factors, patients with RA have significantly advanced multi-vessel CAD in comparison to patients with CAD but no RA. The increased risk of cardiovascular disease seen in RA patients is likely to arise from the underlying RA disease process, and specifically the raised levels of CD4+ and CD28- T cells that have previously been implicated in the pathogenesis of CAD.

Juliette Savin | alfa
Further information:

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Inflammation Triggers Unsustainable Immune Response to Chronic Viral Infection
24.10.2016 | Universität Basel

nachricht Resolving the mystery of preeclampsia
21.10.2016 | Universitätsklinikum Magdeburg

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

Im Focus: New Products - Highlights of COMPAMED 2016

COMPAMED has become the leading international marketplace for suppliers of medical manufacturing. The trade fair, which takes place every November and is co-located to MEDICA in Dusseldorf, has been steadily growing over the past years and shows that medical technology remains a rapidly growing market.

In 2016, the joint pavilion by the IVAM Microtechnology Network, the Product Market “High-tech for Medical Devices”, will be located in Hall 8a again and will...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

First-time reconstruction of infectious bat influenza viruses

25.10.2016 | Life Sciences

Novel method to benchmark and improve the performance of protein measumeasurement techniques

25.10.2016 | Life Sciences

Amazon rain helps make more rain

25.10.2016 | Life Sciences

More VideoLinks >>>