Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Sensor warns of gastrointestinal problems

17.05.2005


Dutch researcher Sebastiaan Herber has developed a sensor which can detect poor blood circulation in the stomach. A high level of carbon dioxide in the stomach is a characteristic of this so-called gastrointestinal ischaemia. By measuring this concentration the sensor can indicate how good or bad the circulation in the stomach wall is.

The main components of the sensor are a pH-sensitive polymer (hydrogel) and a micro pressure sensor. The polymer contains a large quantity of water and shrinks or swells in response to the changing pH-value. It is sandwiched between the micro pressure sensor and a porous, silicon cover. The cover contains a reservoir with bicarbonate electrolyte, covered by a gas-permeable membrane.

Carbon dioxide flows from the stomach through the gas-permeable membrane into the electrolyte, where it initiates a reaction that lowers the pH-value. The pH-sensitive polymer tries to swell in response to this. However, because it is in a confined space it exerts a pressure which the pressure sensor subsequently measures. Conversely, if the carbon dioxide concentration falls, the pH-value increases and the pressure generated by the polymer decreases.



Due to its small size (2.9 mm x 0.9 mm x 0.7 mm) the sensor easily fits in a catheter tip. The catheter is inserted via the nose into the stomach and remains there until the measurement has been completed. Herber developed his sensor to detect gastrointestinal ischaemia at an early stage. Gastrointestinal ischaemia can cause pain after eating, pain after physical exertion, diarrhoea, nausea and a possibly serious loss in weight.

Future plans

Measurements under laboratory conditions have yielded highly promising results to date. New measurements will shortly be carried out at the Medische Spectrum Twente hospital: a 24-hour measurement and an exertion measurement on a home trainer. The sensor is resistant to hydrochloric acid because in both cases it will remain in the stomach for some time. For the measurements, Herber is developing a prototype catheter in cooperation with Sentron Europe BV. They want to produce the sensor, if the measurements prove to be successful.

Interest has also been expressed in using the sensor to measure carbon dioxide levels in the brains of intensive care patients, as this can provide information about the patient’s recovery. Further the sensor can be adapted to measure other substances such as glucose or specific ions.

Sebastiaan Herber’s research is being funded by Technology Foundation STW.

Sebastiaan Herber | alfa
Further information:
http://www.nwo.nl/nwohome.nsf/pages/NWOP_6C8CJF_Eng

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Second cause of hidden hearing loss identified
20.02.2017 | Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

nachricht Prospect for more effective treatment of nerve pain
20.02.2017 | Universität Zürich

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Impacts of mass coral die-off on Indian Ocean reefs revealed

21.02.2017 | Earth Sciences

Novel breast tomosynthesis technique reduces screening recall rate

21.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Use your Voice – and Smart Homes will “LISTEN”

21.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>