Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Obesity hits below the belt: Overweight Americans suffer higher rate of knee cartilage tears

20.04.2005


As body mass index goes up, so does the risk of tearing meniscus

America’s expanding waistline is straining its knees--and pocketbook--with hundreds of thousands of overweight people undergoing surgery every year because the extra pounds they pack are leading to tears in their meniscal cartilage.

In the first major study of its kind, University of Utah School of Medicine researchers found the likelihood of tearing the meniscus, the cartilage that bears much of the load on the knee joint, increases dramatically with body mass index (BMI). (BMI is a measure of body fat based on height and weight. People with a BMI greater than 25 are considered overweight, and those with a BMI of more than 30 are considered obese.)



Overweight people are at least three times more likely to tear their meniscus, while the most obese men and women are 15 and 25 times, respectively, more likely to tear the cartilage, the U researchers report in the May edition of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

All the extra weight Americans are lugging around accounts for up to 450,000 out of 850,000 operations for meniscus tears annually, the researchers conclude. At an average of $3,000 per operation, that adds a whopper of a bill to the nation’s medical costs, according to Kurt T. Hegmann, M.D., M.P.H., research associate professor of family and preventive medicine, who led the study.

"There’s a potential savings of $1.3 billion in the costs associated with meniscus tears in overweight and obese people," said Hegmann, director of the U’s Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational and Environmental Health.

Hegmann and his U colleagues studied 515 patients who underwent meniscal surgery between 1996-2000 at LDS Hospital in Salt Lake City and Utah Valley Regional Medical Center in Provo, Utah. These patients were compared to a control group of 9,944 other Utahns enrolled in the National Cancer Institute’s Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial during the same years.

Participants were grouped into 10 BMI categories, ranging from 20 to greater than 40. The study participants also were grouped in three age categories--50-59; 60-69; and 70-79.

The researchers calculated the Mantel-Haenszel ratio--an age-adjusted odds ratio--for the likelihood of meniscal surgery and found that men with a BMI of 27.5 and higher and women with a BMI of 25 or higher were three times more likely to tear their meniscus. Men whose BMI exceeded 40 were found to be 15 times more likely to tear their meniscus; women in that BMI category were 25 times more likely to tear the meniscus.

"Since 57.4 percent (164 million people) of the U.S. adult population is either overweight or obese, this relationship has potentially large implications for meniscal surgeries," Hegmann and his colleagues state in the article.

The prescription to correct the problem is not complex.

"…A population-based weight management program could decrease future burden on orthopedic and medical-care systems due to meniscal surgeries and treatment of other obesity-related conditions," the researchers state.

Phil Sahm | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.utah.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Second cause of hidden hearing loss identified
20.02.2017 | Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

nachricht Prospect for more effective treatment of nerve pain
20.02.2017 | Universität Zürich

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Impacts of mass coral die-off on Indian Ocean reefs revealed

21.02.2017 | Earth Sciences

Novel breast tomosynthesis technique reduces screening recall rate

21.02.2017 | Medical Engineering

Use your Voice – and Smart Homes will “LISTEN”

21.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>