Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Panel discusses effect of individualized diets on chronic disease risk

05.04.2005


Today (April 4, 2005) at the 2005 Experimental Biology Conference, the Dairy Council of California sponsored a thought-provoking symposium titled "Individualized nutrition as a tool to prevent and treat chronic disease." During the symposium attended by over 250 people, researchers, health professionals, nutritional scientists, and a panel of experts discussed how the progression from broad, population-based guidelines to more finely-tuned dietary recommendations and specific food choices will ultimately result in an improvement in health and chronic disease prevention across the population.



Dr. Johanna Dwyer, National Institutes of Health, commenced the symposium by providing an overview of the past, present and future of individualized dietary recommendations. Specifically she noted that the interest in optimizing health is high and that more sophisticated consumers will expect and demand more tailored food choices. This presents a great opportunity for the nutrition community; however, she cautioned that if the nutrition community does not move on this topic others will in a less scientific and credible fashion.

She also noted that the individualization movement has been driven by consumer demand, individual preferences, the need for personal ownership of health, readiness for change, reducing chronic disease and optimizing health.


In his presentation, symposium speaker Dr. Bruce German, University of California Davis, reminded the audience, "… it is possible and necessary to apply our emerging understanding of an individual’s health status to individualize their diet and match specific foods and their components to health needs." He discussed the need for a new definition of health that encompasses not just freedom from disease but protection from pathogens, prevention of chronic disease, attaining optimal metabolism and improving performance.

German added that technology is one factor driving the movement towards increased individualization, and ultimately will enable the application of it. "Technology will play a vital role in the increasing demand toward individualized dietary recommendations," said German. "Consumers at an increasing rate are purchasing products that they believe will best meet their individual nutritional needs and technology will lead the way in determining what those needs are."

Although there are some basic nutritional guidelines that people should follow, one population-based diet will not work for everyone according to Dr. Ron Krauss, Children’s Hospital Center. During his presentation he elaborated on this point, showing lipid research which has identified types of diets that work for different genotypes of people. For example, in some individuals a low-fat diet can actually be harmful to heart health.

Dr. Myles Faith from the University of Pennsylvania concluded the symposium by discussing the need for a behavior change approach in helping people understand and apply an individualized tactic to obesity prevention and treatment. Using an individualized approach to prevent and treat obesity can be practiced in many arenas beyond the traditional one-on-one counseling. These arenas include public health, policy, research, HMOs and other large agencies and education organizations. Optimal results will be obtained if efforts are coordinated across all arenas.

Kristy Babb | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.dairycouncilofca.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Correct connections are crucial
26.06.2017 | Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin

nachricht One gene closer to regenerative therapy for muscular disorders
01.06.2017 | Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can we see monkeys from space? Emerging technologies to map biodiversity

An international team of scientists has proposed a new multi-disciplinary approach in which an array of new technologies will allow us to map biodiversity and the risks that wildlife is facing at the scale of whole landscapes. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. This international research is led by the Kunming Institute of Zoology from China, University of East Anglia, University of Leicester and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research.

Using a combination of satellite and ground data, the team proposes that it is now possible to map biodiversity with an accuracy that has not been previously...

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

Im Focus: Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared light

Temperature measurements possible even on the smallest scale / Molecular ruby for use in material sciences, biology, and medicine

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Collapse of the European ice sheet caused chaos

27.06.2017 | Earth Sciences

NASA sees quick development of Hurricane Dora

27.06.2017 | Earth Sciences

New method to rapidly map the 'social networks' of proteins

27.06.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>