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Good outlooks on eye surgery - new ophthalmic surgical microscope

01.04.2005



With the new Leica M844 F40, Leica Microsystems introduces an ophthalmic surgical microscope that significantly improves visibility and working conditions for the surgical team during the eye surgery, while protecting the eyes of both surgeon and patient. Brilliant optics, outstanding illumination, perfect balance and easy of use: These are the highlights of the new premium-class microscope system from Leica Microsystems.
One microscope for all disciplines

As eye surgeons become increasingly specialized in new or existing disciplines, their requirements for a surgical microscope grow proportionately. While, for example, the quality of the microscope illumination is critical for operations in the anterior eye segment, the best possible visibility under low light conditions is critical for procedures in the posterior eye segment. The Leica M844 F40 meets these varying requirements and thus can be applied across several disciplines.


Top-quality components guarantee optical brilliance

Unsurpassed image sharpness and the ability to see the finest, even transparent structures, highlight the new Leica M844 F40. Leica uses only top-quality components in this microscope: the original APO OptiChrome™ optics provide maximum resolution, enormous plasticity, outstanding depth of field, high contrast and natural color fidelity. The QuadZoomTM system, with its four parallel beam paths, provides the surgeon with undivided light – independent of the assistant and video system. The new "Depth Enhancer" creates impressive depth of field. The degree of depth of field can be adjusted easily using either the footswitch or the control unit.

Safety first

The greater the transparency of the optics, the greater the light efficiency. That is why, according to its Low Light concept, Leica uses only the best optics in combination with well-proven illumination technology. Less light means more safety – for the eyes of both surgeon and patient.

Clear light conditions

In addition to brilliant optics, surgical microscopy also requires clear light. This is assured at all times by the integrated Leica halogen illumination, which provides a clear, brightly lit image. The latest generation of the dual-beam stereo main illumination ensures a stable fundus red – a particular advantage for use with dynamic eye movements in modern eye surgery. The new and improved Ottoflex™ II auxiliary illuminator, which is independent from the main illumination, improves contrast and red reflex by allowing the brightness and diameter to be varied.

A variety of functions for a variety of uses

The command center is a two-in-one screen with combined control unit and video display. This allows the surgery to be watched in realtime. Individual settings can be saved, making each system unique and personalized. The newly developed "StepCycle™" function allows the surgeon to record entire cycles of microscope movements for later retrieval at the touch of a button. This provides a critical advantage: faster positioning, which leaves the surgeon’s hands free for surgery.

Master of ergonomics

Leica’s latest developments in microsystems technology provide the right conditions for safe, accurate and comfortable work. Thanks to the wide assortment of ergonomic modules and accessories, the new Leica M844 F40 will meet the varied ergonomic requirements of its users. This allows the surgeon and surgical team to work comfortably and without fatigue – whatever their body type and posture.

Marion Müssigmann | Leica Microsystems (Schweiz) AG
Further information:
http://www.surgiscalscopes.com

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