Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Heart Center cardiologist performs rare liver catheter intervention on teen

08.03.2005


Through an innovative catheterization procedure, a pediatric cardiologist at Texas Children’s Heart Center in Houston repaired a severe liver condition in a 14-year-old male. The doctor used a catheter and septal occluder device that is generally used to close holes in children’s hearts. Similar procedures have been reported only six times in medical literature. But this is the first time the procedure has been performed with this particular device.



"Sammy was born with a hole in his liver about the size of a garden hose that has caused him complicated health problems," said Dr. Henri Justino, an interventional cardiologist at Texas Children’s Heart Center and an assistant professor of pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine. "Since we successfully perform a wide variety of interventional cardiac procedures in the catheterization lab every day, we consulted with colleagues in the Liver Center, and decided to apply the same procedure in Sammy’s case," said Justino.

Sammy Drake, a resident of West Texas, was born with a rare liver problem known as patent ductus venosus (PDV). The ductus venosus, a large vein that crosses through the liver and empties near the heart, is normally present before birth and plays an important role in the development of the fetus. After birth, however, the PDV is no longer needed and usually closes on its own. Closure of this vein allows blood returning from the intestines to go to the liver, an essential step needed to filter certain nutrients and toxins in foods.


In Drake’s case, the PDV did not close. Instead, it allowed blood returning from the intestines carrying toxic ammonia, to take a shortcut through the PDV directly into the heart and lungs. The high concentration of ammonia in Sammy’s bloodstream was toxic to many organs, including his brain. Ammonia likely contributed to his chronic lung problems, making him so short of breath that it is difficult for him to speak.

Justino performed the unusual catheterization procedure by inserting two long straw-like catheters into the liver through veins in Sammy leg and neck. Once the catheters reached the liver, the doctor was able to locate and measure the size of the PDV by injecting a dye while viewing through an x-ray camera. Justino then deployed a mesh-like occluder device through one of the catheters, thus filling the liver’s large abnormal vein. The new device now blocks the shortcut channel through the liver. Soon, tissue will grow around the mesh and make a complete closure.

"This is an excellent example of cooperation across medical services," says Dr. Saul Karpen, director, Texas Children’s Liver Center and associate professor of pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine. "Sammy’s ultrasound of the liver looks spectacular, and his now-normal ammonia levels are the lowest they have ever been in his life. Without the procedure to close the PDV, Sammy would possibly require a liver transplant or risk progressive brain damage from the toxic ammonia," Karpen said.

Carol Wittman | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.texaschildrenshospital.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Second cause of hidden hearing loss identified
20.02.2017 | Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

nachricht Prospect for more effective treatment of nerve pain
20.02.2017 | Universität Zürich

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Switched-on DNA

20.02.2017 | Materials Sciences

Second cause of hidden hearing loss identified

20.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

Prospect for more effective treatment of nerve pain

20.02.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>