Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

PENN begins clinical trial of newest technology to treat thoracic aortic aneurysms

17.02.2005


A clinical trial is underway at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP) to study the safety and effectiveness of an endovascular medical device to treat life-threatening thoracic aortic aneurysms. Ronald Fairman, MD, Chief of Vascular Surgery at HUP, is leading the study at Penn and is one of 35 principal investigators in North America to participate in this landmark trial.



Thoracic aortic aneurysms (TAAs) occur when a section of the aorta – the body’s largest artery that carries blood out of the heart and into the organs of the body – weakens and bulges outward like a balloon in the section of the artery that runs down the chest. Each year, more than 20,000 patients in the United States are diagnosed with TAA. Aortic aneurysms – including thoracic and abdominal aortic aneurysms – remain the 13th major cause of death in this country, accounting for nearly 15,000 deaths annually.

"The STARZ-TX2 trial is groundbreaking and excellent news for patients diagnosed with descending thoracic aortic aneurysms," says Dr. Fairman. "Surgery can be life-threatening for many of these patients and a ’wait-and-see’ approach is often not an option because patients are at an increased risk of an aortic rupture. A non-surgical approach to treating this life-threatening disease could benefit thousands of lives."


The clinical trial, called STARZ-TX2 (Study of Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm Repair with the Zenith® TX2™ Thoracic TAA Endovascular Graft), is open to patients diagnosed with a descending thoracic aortic aneurysm. STARZ-TX2 will compare the outcomes of patients treated with open surgery to patients treated with the Zenith TX2 Thoracic TAA Endovascular Graft, manufactured by Cook Incorporated.

Specifically, the trial will assess device performance, as well as patient survival and aneurysm rupture rates in the surgical and endovascular treatment groups, over a 12-month period.

The trial will enroll 275 patients at up to 35 medical institutions in the United States and Canada. Additional trial sites in Japan, Australia and Europe also will participate.

Currently, surgical repair is the standard of care for the treatment of TAAs. Surgical repair requires a surgeon to open the chest cavity, clamp off the aorta and sew a surgical graft in place to prevent an aneurysm from rupturing. Open surgical repairs carry high health risks for many older patients, who may also suffer from other significant medical conditions such as heart disease, lung disease, diabetes or hypertension.

The Zenith TX2 system requires an incision to insert the graft’s hydrophilic, kink-resistant delivery system into the femoral artery in the leg. Once the system is guided into position through the patient’s arteries under fluoroscopy, a one- or two-piece, fabric-covered, self-expanding stent graft is placed inside the weakened section of the thoracic aorta to relieve pressure on the aneurysm, helping to reduce the risk of rupture.

Endovascular treatment of aortic aneurysms has been a common practice for the past 10 years in the United States, Europe and Asia. During that time, significant improvements in treatment outcomes have been observed among patients treated with endovascular devices as compared with standard open surgery. Current endovascular treatments are marketed worldwide for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms.

The major cause of thoracic aortic aneurysms is a hardening of the arteries, a condition in which fatty deposits adhere to the walls of the arteries, which become less elastic and weaker as a result. Major risk factors leading to a hardening of the arteries include smoking and high blood pressure as well as genetics. Other possible causes of TAA include trauma to the aorta and congenital diseases such as Marfan’s syndrome.

Ed Federico | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.uphs.upenn.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Plasmonic biosensors enable development of new easy-to-use health tests
14.12.2017 | Aalto University

nachricht ASU scientists develop new, rapid pipeline for antimicrobials
14.12.2017 | Arizona State University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Plasmonic biosensors enable development of new easy-to-use health tests

14.12.2017 | Health and Medicine

New type of smart windows use liquid to switch from clear to reflective

14.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

BigH1 -- The key histone for male fertility

14.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>