Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Emory researchers find more evidence for children’s growth spurts, pain

14.02.2005


The existence of growth spurts and growing pains in children may be perpetually evident to parents, but their cause has lacked scientific explanation. A new study by Emory University anthropologist Michelle Lampl, M.D., Ph.D., and colleagues at the University of Wisconsin-Madison now sheds some light on this childhood phenomena.



In a five-year study using lambs, the research team found that leg growth occurred primarily when the animals were at rest. While the research does not provide a definitive link to nocturnal growth and the pain that some children experience, it does provide valuable new data and a possible explanation for growing pains, Lampl and colleagues say. Their results were recently published in the November/December 2004 issue of the Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics.

As the first study to demonstrate actual bone growth spurts, it presents a significant leap forward in documenting the process of normal growth spurts, and suggests that infants and children may also grow when they are at rest, Lampl says. "In children, we often view growth as a long continuous arc, especially if we look at annual growth measurements like the charts you might find in your pediatrician’s office. However, growth is not so smooth, and occurs in spurts, as first shown some years ago among our studies of infants," Lampl says. "This is the first animal model to show that growth -- at the level of the bone -- is not a continuum."


To develop the animal model to test her theories, Lampl turned to Norman Wilsman, V.M.D., a professor of comparative biosciences at the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s School of Veterinary Medicine, and his team. The results of their lamb study, which measured the leg bones every three minutes, showed that at least 90 percent of the bone growth occurred when the animals were at rest.

For more than a decade, Lampl has researched growth spurts and growing pains, and documented that children do grow in spurts during the course of a day, which changes the previously held maxim that child growth is constant. The next step in her research will be to identify and define the biology behind the growth, and what triggers it. "This study helps us know what kinds of questions to ask," Lampl says.

What may be occurring is that when an animal is at rest, pressure on the growth plates of long bones such as the tibia is eased, permitting the bones to elongate, she says. Growth plates are soft zones of cartilage near the ends of bones. When a young animal is standing, walking or running, pressure may compact the plate, inhibiting growth, Lampl explains.

Beverly Cox Clark | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.emory.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Minimising risks of transplants
22.02.2018 | Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

nachricht FAU researchers demonstrate that an oxygen sensor in the body reduces inflammation
22.02.2018 | Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Developing reliable quantum computers

International research team makes important step on the path to solving certification problems

Quantum computers may one day solve algorithmic problems which even the biggest supercomputers today can’t manage. But how do you test a quantum computer to...

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stiffness matters

22.02.2018 | Life Sciences

Magnetic field traces gas and dust swirling around supermassive black hole

22.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

First evidence of surprising ocean warming around Galápagos corals

22.02.2018 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>