Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Risk factors affect parents’ attitudes about STD vaccinations


The severity of possible infection and the effectiveness of a vaccine weighed heavily in the decision-making process for parents reporting their views on childhood vaccination for sexually transmitted diseases.

The analysis of 278 parental views on STD vaccination for children was reported in the Feb.7 issue of the Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine by researchers from the Indiana University School of Medicine.

In an ongoing series of studies, lead author Gregory D. Zimet, Ph.D., professor of pediatrics and clinical psychology, and his colleagues are evaluating parental attitudes toward adolescent vaccination for STDs in anticipation of availability of vaccines that are currently in various stages of development.

"Health professionals have expressed concern that many parents will be resistant for a variety of reasons to vaccinating children or adolescents for sexually transmitted diseases," said Dr. Zimet. "Our research is proactive and we hope to provide physicians with an understanding of the issues parents may have about STD vaccines by the time they are on the market."

The participants, who were parents or guardians accompanying a child between the ages of 12 and 17 years to a pediatric clinic visit, completed a survey to test their reaction to nine hypothetical vaccine scenarios. Variables included the mode of transmission (sexually transmitted or not sexually transmitted); severity of infection (curable with antibiotics, chronic and incurable, or usually fatal); vaccine effectiveness (50 percent, 70 percent or 90 percent); and availability of behavioral methods for prevention (yes or no).

The scenarios mixed the variables to present a clear picture of preferences and concerns about STD vaccination. Parents expressed little difference in their willingness to accept a vaccine whether it was for an STD or an infection that is not sexually transmitted. However, parents showed a preference in the scenarios for vaccines:

  • that prevented a potentially fatal infection
  • were 90 percent effective
  • provided protection for an infection that could not be avoided through behavioral modification.

"The most surprising result was that parents did not distinguish between STD and non-STD vaccines, but were equally favorable in their assessments regardless of the sexually transmissibility of the infection," said Dr. Zimet.

The results are relatively consistent with preliminary research indicating that most parents are focused on protecting their children’s health and not as concerned with the source of infection, he said.

Only 6 percent of the parents expressed an aversion toward STD vaccines in general. Dr. Zimet said future studies will focus more specifically on this group of parents to better understand the source of their reluctance.

Mary Hardin | EurekAlert!
Further information:

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht NIH scientists describe potential antibody treatment for multidrug-resistant K. pneumoniae
14.03.2018 | NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

nachricht Researchers identify key step in viral replication
13.03.2018 | University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Mars' oceans formed early, possibly aided by massive volcanic eruptions

Oceans formed before Tharsis and evolved together, shaping climate history of Mars

A new scenario seeking to explain how Mars' putative oceans came and went over the last 4 billion years implies that the oceans formed several hundred million...

Im Focus: Tiny implants for cells are functional in vivo

For the first time, an interdisciplinary team from the University of Basel has succeeded in integrating artificial organelles into the cells of live zebrafish embryos. This innovative approach using artificial organelles as cellular implants offers new potential in treating a range of diseases, as the authors report in an article published in Nature Communications.

In the cells of higher organisms, organelles such as the nucleus or mitochondria perform a range of complex functions necessary for life. In the networks of...

Im Focus: Locomotion control with photopigments

Researchers from Göttingen University discover additional function of opsins

Animal photoreceptors capture light with photopigments. Researchers from the University of Göttingen have now discovered that these photopigments fulfill an...

Im Focus: Surveying the Arctic: Tracking down carbon particles

Researchers embark on aerial campaign over Northeast Greenland

On 15 March, the AWI research aeroplane Polar 5 will depart for Greenland. Concentrating on the furthest northeast region of the island, an international team...

Im Focus: Unique Insights into the Antarctic Ice Shelf System

Data collected on ocean-ice interactions in the little-researched regions of the far south

The world’s second-largest ice shelf was the destination for a Polarstern expedition that ended in Punta Arenas, Chile on 14th March 2018. Oceanographers from...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Industry & Economy
Event News

Virtual reality conference comes to Reutlingen

19.03.2018 | Event News

Ultrafast Wireless and Chip Design at the DATE Conference in Dresden

16.03.2018 | Event News

International Tinnitus Conference of the Tinnitus Research Initiative in Regensburg

13.03.2018 | Event News

Latest News

Physicists made crystal lattice from polaritons

20.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Mars' oceans formed early, possibly aided by massive volcanic eruptions

20.03.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Thawing permafrost produces more methane than expected

20.03.2018 | Earth Sciences

Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>