Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Tell me the size of your waist and I will tell you if you are in risk of prostate cancer

04.02.2005


Visceral fat, which is the fat found around our organs, is associated with increased danger of prostate cancer say scientists in today issue of Obesity Research.

For a long time abdominal obesity has been associated with an increase in cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, hypertension and some types of cancers. But until now, it has not been possible to establish a relationship between prostate cancer and weight, even if evidence supports the idea that environmental factors, such as western diet and life style, affect the incidence of the disease. A clear example of this relationship is the increase in prostate cancer among Japanese men emigrating to the United States from Japan (where the disease is still rare).

Pedro Von Hafe, Henrique Barros and colleagues from the Faculty of Medicine of Porto and the Hospital of São João, Porto, Portugal hypothesised that previous inconclusive results, found when studying the relationship between fat and prostate cancer, were due to the fact that the existence of different types of adipose tissue was never taken into account. And different types of fat tissue, because they possess different types of metabolism that produce different biochemical substances, affect the body in very different ways.



Adipose tissue in the human body comes in two types: subcutaneous fat which is located just below the skin, and visceral fat, which is located, unnoticed, below the muscles surrounding our vital organs and is much more harmful than subcutaneous adiposity. In fact, visceral fat is known, for example, to predispose to cardiovascular and metabolic problems although the mechanism(s) by which these complications appear is still not known.

Von Hafe, Barros and colleagues in order to understand the contribution of different types of adipose tissue to prostate cancer used computerized axial tomography, a technique that employs advanced x-ray technology and allows to distinguish, and individually measure, different types of adipose tissue. The team of scientists compared sixty-three prostate cancer male patients with sixty-three healthy controls from the same sex and ethnical background and with similar age, height and weight. Very interestingly, it was found that higher quantities of visceral fat, but not of subcutaneous fat, were associated with prostate cancer. This result corroborates the researchers ’ hypothesis that different fat have different effects in prostate cancer incidence. The quantity of visceral fat, however, did not correlate with the disease stage, indicating that once established, other factors contribute to the evolution of disease.

The different results found between visceral and subcutaneous fat, probably result from different biochemical substances produced by each of the adipose tissue, which will affect the body in different ways. Furthermore, contributing for the harmful effect of visceral fat is the fact that this type of adiposity tends to be metabolised by the liver into fatty acids and released into the blood what will ultimately lead to an increase of insulin in the blood. And insulin is known to be capable of induce the growth of cancerigenous cells, including cells from prostate tumours.

Von Hafe, Barros and colleagues’ work is important because it alerts to the importance of distinguish between different types of fat when calculating individual obesity levels and their potential risk to health. Furthermore, comprehension of the mechanisms leading to prostate cancer is the first step for disease prevention.

Piece researched and written by: Catarina Amorim (catarina.amorim@linacre.ox.ac.uk)

Catarina Amorim | alfa
Further information:
http://www.obesityresearch.org/cgi/content/abstract/12/12/1930

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Researchers release the brakes on the immune system
18.10.2017 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

nachricht Norovirus evades immune system by hiding out in rare gut cells
12.10.2017 | University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NRL clarifies valley polarization for electronic and optoelectronic technologies

20.10.2017 | Interdisciplinary Research

Metallic nanoparticles will help to determine the percentage of volatile compounds

20.10.2017 | Materials Sciences

Shallow soils promote savannas in South America

20.10.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>