Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Early seizures after epilepsy surgery predict more seizures

24.01.2005


The prevailing medical understanding of seizures in the weeks just after epilepsy surgery is that they are likely to be temporary, probably due to swelling or minor trauma suffered by the brain during the operation.

In fact, early seizures after the most common form of epilepsy surgery signal a greatly increased likelihood that the patient will continue to have seizures, according to a study published online January 24, 2005, in the Annals of Neurology (http://www.interscience.wiley.com/journal/ana).

"These findings have implications for patient counseling, but they are also interesting in terms of understanding epilepsy," said lead author Anne M. McIntosh, Ph.D., of the University of Melbourne in Australia. "We can speculate that some individuals who undergo this procedure have epilepsy that for some reason is more persistent."



There have been hints from smaller studies that early seizures following surgery are not all benign, but the Melbourne study, with 325 patients who underwent temporal lobe removal (lobectomy), is the largest to date. Temporal lobectomy is the most common form of epilepsy surgery, targeting the area where seizures commonly begin. It eliminates or reduces seizures in most cases.

McIntosh and colleagues found that patients who experienced a seizure in the four weeks following surgery -- in the absence of surgery-related triggers such as trauma or swelling -- were eight times more likely to have persistent epilepsy several months later. Even among the patients with evidence of these seizure triggers there was a three-fold increase in the likelihood of continuing epilepsy.
Given that surgery is only performed in cases where the disease is debilitating, these results do not cast doubt on the procedure itself. "Many subjects who have a return of epilepsy still have ongoing benefit from the procedure in terms of reduced seizure frequency," said McIntosh.

Epilepsy is a chronic illness of the brain that is estimated to affect one percent of the U.S. population -- about 2.5 million people. During an epileptic seizure, nerve cells in the brain fire electrical impulses much faster than normal, often leading to muscular convulsions or loss of consciousness.

Many epilepsy patients can be successfully treated with medications that prevent the formation of the "electrical storms" in the brain that cause seizures. "About 20 percent of patients have epilepsy that does not respond to medication, and perhaps a third of these may be suitable for surgery," said McIntosh. This is particularly true of temporal lobe epilepsy, where seizures begin in the temporal lobe of the brain and spread to other regions.

Others authors of the study were Renate M. Kalnins, FRACP, Anne Mitchell, PRACR, and Samuel F. Berkovic, MD.

David Greenberg | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.interscience.wiley.com/journal/ana
http://www.aneuroa.org
http://www.wiley.com

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht GLUT5 fluorescent probe fingerprints cancer cells
20.04.2018 | Michigan Technological University

nachricht Scientists re-create brain neurons to study obesity and personalize treatment
20.04.2018 | Cedars-Sinai Medical Center

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Spider silk key to new bone-fixing composite

University of Connecticut researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.

Repairing major load-bearing bones such as those in the leg can be a long and uncomfortable process.

Im Focus: Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces is the outcome of an international effort that included teams from Dresden and Berlin in Germany, and the US.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia...

Im Focus: Gamma-ray flashes from plasma filaments

Novel highly efficient and brilliant gamma-ray source: Based on model calculations, physicists of the Max PIanck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg propose a novel method for an efficient high-brilliance gamma-ray source. A giant collimated gamma-ray pulse is generated from the interaction of a dense ultra-relativistic electron beam with a thin solid conductor. Energetic gamma-rays are copiously produced as the electron beam splits into filaments while propagating across the conductor. The resulting gamma-ray energy and flux enable novel experiments in nuclear and fundamental physics.

The typical wavelength of light interacting with an object of the microcosm scales with the size of this object. For atoms, this ranges from visible light to...

Im Focus: Basel researchers succeed in cultivating cartilage from stem cells

Stable joint cartilage can be produced from adult stem cells originating from bone marrow. This is made possible by inducing specific molecular processes occurring during embryonic cartilage formation, as researchers from the University and University Hospital of Basel report in the scientific journal PNAS.

Certain mesenchymal stem/stromal cells from the bone marrow of adults are considered extremely promising for skeletal tissue regeneration. These adult stem...

Im Focus: Like a wedge in a hinge

Researchers lay groundwork to tailor drugs for new targets in cancer therapy

In the fight against cancer, scientists are developing new drugs to hit tumor cells at so far unused weak points. Such a “sore spot” is the protein complex...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

IWOLIA: A conference bringing together German Industrie 4.0 and French Industrie du Futur

09.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Magnetic nano-imaging on a table top

20.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Start of work for the world's largest electric truck

20.04.2018 | Interdisciplinary Research

Atoms may hum a tune from grand cosmic symphony

20.04.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>