Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


‘Casodex’ (bicalutamide) 150mg a cost effective treatment for the management of locally advanced prostate cancer[1]


New health economic data published in the European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy outline the cost benefits of the non-steroidal anti-androgen bicalutamide 150mg for the treatment of locally advanced prostate cancer. By delaying disease progression in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer, bicalutamide 150mg reduces the additional healthcare costs associated with treating advanced disease.

The paper by Dr Heather Payne, Middlesex Hospital UCL, London states that bicalutamide 150mg impacts less on healthcare budgets compared to other types of cancer treatments.1* An analysis of the cost-effectiveness of bicalutamide 150mg based on the first analysis of the Early Prostate Cancer (EPC) Trial, shows that its estimated cost-effectiveness per quality-adjusted life year (£10,067) falls well below the commonly used threshold for cost-effectiveness (£29,212) and compares well with the cost-utilities of other approaches used in oncology.2,3

The cost of bicalutamide 150mg (administered for three years) plus radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer is also significantly lower compared to the cost of other oncology treatments.2,3

Progression of locally advanced prostate cancer can result in costly complications such as bone metastases and serious skeletal complications.4

In addition, Dr Payne highlights in her paper, that bicalutamide 150mg gives a significant improvement in progression-free survival in patients with locally advanced disease, reducing the risk of objective disease progression by 42% in radiotherapy patients, 47% in watchful waiting patients, and 29% in radical prostatectomy patients.5

As well as being as effective as castration in prolonging survival in non-metastatic prostate cancer6, bicalutamide 150mg has significant quality-of-life benefits, with improvements over castration-based therapies in terms of maintaining bone mineral density, physical capacity and sexual activity.6,7 A recent study of the risk of osteoporosis in men with non-metastatic prostate cancer revealed that those who were treated with bicalutamide 150mg maintained bone mineral density (BMD), whilst those who received castration were associated with a progressive loss of BMD, which can result in costly complications such as increased risk of fractures.7

Dr Payne concludes: “Bicalutamide 150mg is a cost-effective therapy for patients with locally advanced prostate cancer, delaying disease progression, and offers a valuable alternative to castration in this setting”.

Bicalutamide 150mg is indicated in the UK in patients with locally advanced prostate cancer (T3-T4, any N, MO; T1-T2, N+, MO), as immediate therapy either alone or as adjuvant to treatment by radical prostatectomy or radiotherapy. Bicalutamide 150mg is also indicated for the management of patients with locally advanced, non-metastatic prostate cancer for whom surgical castration or other medical intervention is not considered appropriate or acceptable.8

*Data is based on UK NHS costs and may vary in other countries


1. Payne, H. The value of delaying disease progression with bicalutamide (‘Casodex’) 150mg in locally advanced prostate cancer. European Journal of Hospital Pharmacy. 2004.

2. Moeremans K, Caekelbergh K, Annemans L. Cost-effectiveness analysis of bicalutamide (CasodexTM) for adjuvant treatment of early prostate cancer. Value Health 2004; 7: 472-81.

3. Earle CC, Chapman RH, Baker CS, Bell CM, Stone PW, Sandberg EA, Neumann PJ.

Systematic overview of cost-utility assessments in oncology. J Clin Oncol 2000; 18:3302-17.

4. Groot MT, Boeken Kruger CG, Pelger RC, Uyl-de Groot CA. Costs of prostate cancer,

metastatic to the bone, in the Netherlands. Eur Urol 2003; 43: 226-32.

5. Wirth M et al. Bicalutamide (Casodex) 150mg as adjuvant to radical prostatectomy significantly increases progression-free survival in patients with early non-metastatic prostate cancer: analysis at a median follow-up of 5.4 years. J Urol. 2004; 172: 1865–1870.

6. Iversen P, Tyrell CJ, Kaisary AV et al Bicalutamide monotherapy compared with castration in patients with nonmetastatic locally advanced prostate cancer: 6.3 years of followup. J.Urol 2000; 164: 1579-1582.

7. Sieber PR, Keiller DL, Kahnoski RJ et al Bicalutamide 150 mg maintains bone mineral density during monotherapy for localized or locally advanced prostate cancer. Urology 2004; 171: 2272-6.

8. AstraZeneca; Casodex (bicalutamide)150mg Summary of Product Characteristics.

Bea Shake | alfa
Further information:

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Advanced analysis of brain structure shape may track progression to Alzheimer's disease
26.10.2016 | Massachusetts General Hospital

nachricht Indian roadside refuse fires produce toxic rainbow
26.10.2016 | Duke University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

How nanoscience will improve our health and lives in the coming years

27.10.2016 | Materials Sciences

OU-led team discovers rare, newborn tri-star system using ALMA

27.10.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

'Neighbor maps' reveal the genome's 3-D shape

27.10.2016 | Life Sciences

More VideoLinks >>>