Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Endoscopic sinus surgery is safe, effective in older patients

03.01.2005


Minimally invasive surgery to alleviate the pain and pressure of sinusitis is a safe, effective therapy for geriatric patients who can’t be helped by medication alone, according to new research.



"This tells us that we should not neglect sinus problems in the elderly; that if medicines don’t work, we have a surgical technique that is not that invasive and results in good outcomes," says Dr. Stilianos E. Kountakis, otolaryngologist, vice chair of the Medical College of Georgia Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery and a principal author on the study published in the December issue of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery. "There is a way to improve symptoms either with medicine or surgery if necessary, and it’s worth pursuing because patients feel better overall and have better quality of life."

Dr. Kountakis and collaborators, led by Drs. J. Chris Colclasure and Charles W. Gross at the University of Virginia Health System, looked at 56 patients over age 60 who underwent functional endoscopic sinus surgery, which uses small cameras and monitors to approach sinuses through the nose and minimize trauma.


They found patients continued to report improvement in symptoms over the year following surgery, had few minor complications and no major complications, Dr. Kountakis says. The findings are comparable to studies of younger patient populations.

Sinusitis, which affects some 30 million Americans, is the sixth most common chronic condition of the elderly, says Dr. Kountakis. "As we mature, the sinus lining is not as efficient at transporting secretions so secretions stay behind, sinuses become obstructed more easily and more easily infected."

Despite the high incidence, sinusitis can go untreated in some elderly patients because other conditions take priority and/or create the perception that sinusitis is more difficult to treat in older patients, says Dr. Kountakis, who directs the Georgia Sinus and Allergy Center.

"We thought that maybe the endoscopic sinus surgery wouldn’t be as effective because of the decreased efficiency of the sinuses that naturally occurs with age, but that wasn’t the case. We thought maybe other medical problems, might make surgery less safe and effective, but that wasn’t the case either," he says.

Instead they found 64 percent improvement in symptoms at three months, 73 percent improvement at six months and 75 percent improvement at 12 months, based on patient reports of their symptoms as well as physical exams.

Medical therapy, including inflammation-reducing steroids, mucus thinners and salt-water douches to moisturize and clean the sinuses, is always the first approach to treatment, Dr. Kountakis says. But after about a month, if the condition is no better, a surgical approach through the nose can be used to remove obstructions and/or widen sinus passages. Typically patients will continue to need some type of medicine following surgery to help keep their condition in check.

Toni Baker | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.mcg.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Biofilm discovery suggests new way to prevent dangerous infections
23.05.2017 | University of Texas at Austin

nachricht Another reason to exercise: Burning bone fat -- a key to better bone health
19.05.2017 | University of North Carolina Health Care

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Turmoil in sluggish electrons’ existence

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behaviour of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

We can refer to electrons in non-conducting materials as ‘sluggish’. Typically, they remain fixed in a location, deep inside an atomic composite. It is hence...

Im Focus: Wafer-thin Magnetic Materials Developed for Future Quantum Technologies

Two-dimensional magnetic structures are regarded as a promising material for new types of data storage, since the magnetic properties of individual molecular building blocks can be investigated and modified. For the first time, researchers have now produced a wafer-thin ferrimagnet, in which molecules with different magnetic centers arrange themselves on a gold surface to form a checkerboard pattern. Scientists at the Swiss Nanoscience Institute at the University of Basel and the Paul Scherrer Institute published their findings in the journal Nature Communications.

Ferrimagnets are composed of two centers which are magnetized at different strengths and point in opposing directions. Two-dimensional, quasi-flat ferrimagnets...

Im Focus: World's thinnest hologram paves path to new 3-D world

Nano-hologram paves way for integration of 3-D holography into everyday electronics

An Australian-Chinese research team has created the world's thinnest hologram, paving the way towards the integration of 3D holography into everyday...

Im Focus: Using graphene to create quantum bits

In the race to produce a quantum computer, a number of projects are seeking a way to create quantum bits -- or qubits -- that are stable, meaning they are not much affected by changes in their environment. This normally needs highly nonlinear non-dissipative elements capable of functioning at very low temperatures.

In pursuit of this goal, researchers at EPFL's Laboratory of Photonics and Quantum Measurements LPQM (STI/SB), have investigated a nonlinear graphene-based...

Im Focus: Bacteria harness the lotus effect to protect themselves

Biofilms: Researchers find the causes of water-repelling properties

Dental plaque and the viscous brown slime in drainpipes are two familiar examples of bacterial biofilms. Removing such bacterial depositions from surfaces is...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

AWK Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium 2017: Internet of Production for Agile Enterprises

23.05.2017 | Event News

Dortmund MST Conference presents Individualized Healthcare Solutions with micro and nanotechnology

22.05.2017 | Event News

Innovation 4.0: Shaping a humane fourth industrial revolution

17.05.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Zap! Graphene is bad news for bacteria

23.05.2017 | Life Sciences

Medical gamma-ray camera is now palm-sized

23.05.2017 | Medical Engineering

Discovery of an alga's 'dictionary of genes' could lead to advances in biofuels, medicine

23.05.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>