Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

McMaster researchers develop test for rare bleeding disorder

23.12.2004


Researchers at McMaster University have developed the first assessment tool of its kind for evaluating risks faced by Canadians suffering from a rare and often fatal bleeding disorder.

Their detailed bleeding questionnaire helps discriminate between patients - often in the same family - affected by a puzzling and rare condition known as Quebec Platelet Disorder (QPD) and those who are not.

The new tool for detecting different symptoms and complications was developed in the laboratory of hematologist Dr. Catherine Hayward, an associate professor in the departments of pathology and molecular medicine and medicine in the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine of McMaster’s Faculty of Health Sciences. The Transfusion Medicine Research Team at McMaster, headed by Nancy Heddle, helped develop the tool. Before Hayward began her research, Quebec families with this bleeding disorder didn’t know what was causing their illness—or even what they suffered from.



Bleeding disorders tend to run in families and can be particularly difficult to detect. Normally, when a person bleeds, blood clots stop the bleeding. The clotting process (coagulation) requires both blood cells (platelets) and proteins (clotting factors). In bleeding disorders, blood platelets are not working as they should or there are too few platelets, or clotting factors, which cause bleeding to continue for longer than normal.

Gold standard tests are available to determine risks in diseases such as heart attacks and strokes but there has never been gold standards for rare bleeding disorders, such as QPD. Although this specific disorder appears to affect a few families in Quebec, this tool is a step forward to developing a better way to assess bleeding problems in many other conditions.

The McMaster researchers developed a detailed bleeding history questionnaire based on interviews with physicians and focus groups of patients who suffered a broad spectrum of bleeding disorders, and applied this with a “gold standard” laboratory test her group developed for the QPD. "It is touching that what patients told us to ask about proved to be valuable clues to helpful bleeding symptoms," said Dr. Hayward.

The researchers gave the questionnaire to 127 relatives in two families with QPD who ranged in age from one year to 89 years. Their average age was 34.

They found those with QPD had a much higher likelihood of bleeding that led to lifestyle changes, bruises that spread or became as large, or larger, than an orange, bleeding in joints and bleeding that lasted longer than 24 hours. The study has established the consequences of inheriting the QPD - a disease that transforms platelets from “clot formers” into “clot busters.” “This is going to be very helpful to doctors trying to sort out if a patient with bleeding has the QPD,” said Dr. Hayward.

Dr. James N. George of the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Centre commented in the journal Blood that the study by McMaster scientists has important lessons for hematologists who investigate and manage patients with bleeding disorders by providing new insights into this condition. "The use of quantitative measures of bleeding symptoms will allow for greater understanding of the interactions of multiple common inherited traits on the risks for excessive bleeding," he said.

Fifteen years ago, Dr. Hayward made scientific history when she discovered a previously unknown protein called multimerin 1, one of the largest proteins in the human body. This discovery led her to study bleeding problems experienced by QPD families and how platelets support blood clotting.

Earlier this month, Samira B. Jeimy, a graduate student in Hayward’s McMaster research laboratory, presented a study that was chosen from among more than 5,700 abstracts submissions for delivery at the American Society of Hematology’s annual meeting in San Diego. The society’s annual meeting is the premier hematology meeting in the world and attended by more than 20,000 scientists.
Jeimy’s study centred on the molecular interactions between the platelet protein multimerin 1 and the blood clot accelerator factor V. She found that factor V and multimerin 1 bind in a unique way, without blocking clot formation. Ultimately, the advance may lead to new tests and treatments for diseases with too little, or too much, blood clot formation, such as heart attacks and strokes.

Jeimy is enrolled in the medical sciences graduate program at McMaster and holds a master’s studentship award from the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario. Her research was supported by a Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) grant, and by Dr. Hayward’s Heart and Stroke Foundation Career Investigator Award and Canada Research Chair. The study was done in collaboration with world experts on factor V - Dr. William Kane, Duke University, United States; Dr. Bjorn Dahlback, Lund University, Sweden; and Dr. Gerry Nicolaes, Maastricht University, Netherlands.

Veronica McGuire | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.mcmaster.ca

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Laser activated gold pyramids could deliver drugs, DNA into cells without harm
24.03.2017 | Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

nachricht What does congenital Zika syndrome look like?
24.03.2017 | University of California - San Diego

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen

24.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>