Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Strokes: Dental x-rays reveal more than cavities

13.12.2004


Dental visits usually result in patient recommendations to floss or reschedule more appointments to treat a cavity, however, some patients are learning they may be at risk for a stroke too, according to a case report in the November/December issue of General Dentistry, the Academy of General Dentistry’s (AGD) clinical, peer-reviewed journal.



According to the American Stroke Association (ASA), every 45 seconds, someone in America has a stroke. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States today and the leading cause of serious disability. But a trip to the dentist may help determine risk for a stroke.

Radiographs (x-rays) help a dentist observe the condition of a patient’s teeth, roots, jaw placement and overall placement of facial bones. X-rays can pinpoint the location of cavities and other signs of disease impossible to detect through a visual examination. A panoramic x-ray allows a dentist to see the entire structure of the mouth in a single image. Because of their proximity to the mouth, carotid arteries (located on each side of the neck) often appear in these x-rays. Communicating any stroke risk factors patients have can help a dentist determine if their patient is at risk.


In his case report, Dov M. Almog, DMD, incidentally detected in his patient’s panoramic x-ray calcifications in one of the carotid arteries. He referred the patient to his primary care physician for further testing and observation, revealing 80 percent stenosis (blockage).

"Panoramic x-rays are extremely useful for observing a patient’s oral health," says Dr. Almog. "But they are also a beneficial adjunct screening tool for identifying patients at risk for stroke."

Patients already at risk should share their medical history with their dentist and ask the dentist to be aware of any signs of calcifications that may show up during their regular dental check-ups.

"Dentists are concerned not only with a patient’s oral health, but also their overall well-being," says Eric Curtis, DDS, and AGD spokesperson. "If a dentist is aware of the medical history of the patient, he/she can pay close attention to the radiographs and refer patients for follow-up medical care when appropriate."

If blockage were detected on the radiograph, a patient would likely be referred for a Carotid Duplex Ultrasound. This test uses high-frequency sound waves to view the blood vessels in the neck. The blockage could be treated in a variety of ways including: lifestyle modification, medications such as blood thinners, surgery or other interventional procedures such as a catheter.

Treatable risk factors for stroke

  • High blood pressure
  • Tobacco use
  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Carotid or other artery disease
  • Heart disease or disorders
  • Transient ischemic attacks (warning strokes)
  • Blood disorders
  • High blood cholesterol
  • Obesity
  • Excessive alcohol use
  • Illegal drug use

Jennifer Starkey | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.agd.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Second cause of hidden hearing loss identified
20.02.2017 | Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan

nachricht Prospect for more effective treatment of nerve pain
20.02.2017 | Universität Zürich

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Positrons as a new tool for lithium ion battery research: Holes in the electrode

22.02.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

New insights into the information processing of motor neurons

22.02.2017 | Life Sciences

Healthy Hiking in Smart Socks

22.02.2017 | Innovative Products

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>