Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New system reduces risk of burns during interventional X-rays

06.12.2004


System helps physicians prevent radiation-induced skin injuries to patients



The threading of slender catheters and stents through arteries to deliver treatments to the heart, the brain and elsewhere in the body has produced nothing short of a medical revolution. But these delicate procedures require that patients be exposed to continuous radiation that can last up to an hour or more, sometimes causing skin injuries that, in rare cases, develop necrosis (tissue death), requiring skin grafts.

Now University at Buffalo researchers, working with an Amherst, N.Y., startup company called Esensors have developed a unique, real-time patient dose-tracking system, which lets physicians know when the accumulated radiation dose is approaching a dangerous threshold. The system is designed to be used either as a retrofit with existing fluoroscopy machines or to be included in the design of new machines.


Funded by grants totaling $814,000 from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration under the Small Business Innovation and Research program, the team of researchers is completing a prototype that will be clinically site-tested prior to commercialization. "Our system provides complete tracking of actual radiation levels on the skin, providing both instantaneous dose rate, as well as cumulative exposure," explained Daniel Bednarek, Ph.D., UB project director, researcher at UB’s Toshiba Stroke Research Center, professor of radiology and research associate professor of neurosurgery and biophysics in the School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.

Development of the system was spurred by a growing concern among physicians and by advisories issued by the Food and Drug Administration’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health warning of occasional, but severe, radiation-induced skin injuries during prolonged, fluoroscopically guided invasive procedures. "It can take a long time to insert a catheter into the brain and perform a complicated endovascular treatment, for example," explained Bednarek, also an adjunct professor in the Department of Physics in UB’s College of Arts and Sciences. "Patients undergoing such procedures sometimes develop erythema – redness – hair loss or even skin necrosis in the exposed area."

These effects can result whenever long fluoroscopic times are used during interventional procedures, such as coronary angioplasty, stent placement, radiofrequency cardiac ablation and vascular embolization. "With the equipment that currently is being used, the physician can minimize the chance for burns by moving the X-ray source instead of keeping the intensity on one spot," explained Darold Wobschall, Ph.D., UB professor emeritus of electrical engineering and president of Esensors. "The problem is that the physician is concentrating on the surgery and with X-rays coming in, he or she would have to be keeping mental track of where the dose is occurring at the same time." "Our system solves that problem," said Wobschall.

Through electronic sensors, the system tracks the position of the X-ray gantry and patient table, and thus, the location of the X-ray relative to the patient to determine the radiation exposure at the patient’s skin, he explained. "The computer tracks the beam’s location and intensity, presenting the beam and the cumulative distribution of dose on the patient’s skin as a color-coded graphic on a display screen," he said.

As the dose accumulates, the color on the display changes from green, which is acceptable, through yellow to red, which is a signal that the patient could be receiving too much radiation. This visualization of the X-ray beam and its location with reference to a graphic model of the patient presents the physician with real-time visual feedback, allowing him or her to make the appropriate adjustments. An added feature under development includes a visualization of the distribution and amount of X-ray scatter throughout the room, providing a way to gauge exposure for the physician and other health-care personnel who may be present.

The development effort for the computer graphic display was led by co-investigator Kevin Chugh, Ph.D., formerly a research scientist in UB’s New York State Center for Engineering Design and Industrial Innovation (NYSCEDII).

Petru M. Dinu, a doctoral candidate in the UB Department of Physics in the College of Arts and Sciences, played a major role in developing the system at UB’s Toshiba Stroke Research Center.

Ellen Goldbaum | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.buffalo.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht New malaria analysis method reveals disease severity in minutes
14.08.2017 | University of British Columbia

nachricht New type of blood cells work as indicators of autoimmunity
14.08.2017 | Instituto de Medicina Molecular

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A Map of the Cell’s Power Station

18.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Engineering team images tiny quasicrystals as they form

18.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Researchers printed graphene-like materials with inkjet

18.08.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>