Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Loyola study shows drug-coated stent induces less inflammation than bare metal stent

10.11.2004


In the treatment of coronary artery disease, a sirolimus drug-coated stent causes less inflammation than bare metal stents, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association annual meeting by Loyola University Health System, Maywood, Ill.



“Inflammatory response is a sign of advancing heart disease, so the less inflammation the better,” said lead author Dr. Fred Leya, professor of medicine/cardiology, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine.

Stents are small stainless steel coils or scaffolds which are used to keep blood vessels open and maintain blood flow to the heart. The drug-coated stent reduces the risk of restenosis (renarrowing) of blood vessels after angioplasty, a common problem with earlier stents, where 30 percent of arteries renarrowed. “Many times with the earlier stents, tissue cells grew too much scar tissue, renarrowing the artery that the stent was supposed to widen,” said Leya, director, interventional cardiology and director, cardiac catherization lab at Loyola. Leya said that the FDA-approved stent produces immediate results. “It is especially appropriate for diabetics, because they have smaller arteries and thus a greater risk of restenosis of coronary vessels following angioplasty,” he said.


Participating in the inflammation study were 55 patients: 27 received the drug-coated stent; another 28 patients were treated with a bare-metal stent. Researchers, looking for inflammation markers, took blood samples at baseline, and at 12- to 24 hours and four- to six hours after the procedure. Results of the study shows that inflammatory response was substantially reduced among patients who received the drug eluting stent compared to the bare metal stent. The next step, Leya said, is to measure inflammatory markers at one-year.

The stent uses a polymer, which acts as a time-release mechanism over approximately 30-45 days, to deliver medication that inhibits excessive cell growth into lumen of the vessel. “The advantage of the drug used on this stent is that it does not kill the cells, it just inhibits their growth,” said Leya, noting that when cells die, thrombosis (blood clots) could result. According to Leya, the latest research shows that with the new stent, renarrowing occurs in only 5 percent to 7 percent of patients. “That is good news for the hundreds of thousands of people who may need angioplasty and a stent this year,” said Leya.

Presenting the study at the AHA meeting is Walter Jeske, PhD, associate professor, department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Loyola University Health System.

Co-authors of the study with Jeske are Gary Maszak, Tony DeMartini, Dr. Omer Iqbal, Dr. Leslie Cho, Dr. Bruce Lewis, Dr. Lowell Steen, Fred Leya and Jeanine M. Walenga, PhD, Loyola University Health System.

The American Heart Association meeting continues through November 10.

Joanne Swanson | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.lumc.edu
http://www.luhs.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Study suggests possible new target for treating and preventing Alzheimer's
02.12.2016 | Oregon Health & Science University

nachricht The first analysis of Ewing's sarcoma methyloma opens doors to new treatments
01.12.2016 | IDIBELL-Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

Im Focus: Molecules change shape when wet

Broadband rotational spectroscopy unravels structural reshaping of isolated molecules in the gas phase to accommodate water

In two recent publications in the Journal of Chemical Physics and in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, researchers around Melanie Schnell from the Max...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA's AIM observes early noctilucent ice clouds over Antarctica

05.12.2016 | Earth Sciences

Shape matters when light meets atom

05.12.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

Researchers uncover protein-based “cancer signature”

05.12.2016 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>