Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Brain surgery to be broadcast live to a UK audience for first time at Dana Centre

25.10.2004


For the first time, the public will have the extraordinary opportunity to observe live brain surgery in a pioneering event at the Science Museum’s Dana Centre in London, on Thursday 28 October.

Broadcast for the first time to a UK audience, visitors to the Dana Centre will not only watch live surgery, but be able to direct questions to the surgical team in the USA whilst the operation takes place. Live from Brainworks will be broadcast across the Atlantic Ocean from Overlook Hospital, New Jersey where a team of surgeons will be removing a Meningioma (or benign tumour) from a patient.
Live from Brainworks is the second live operation broadcast at the Dana Centre - the UK’s newest venue designed to tackle contemporary and controversial science head on - which pioneered the live broadcast of cardiac bypass surgery earlier this year. The broadcast is in association with the award-winning educational programme developed by Liberty Science Center, New Jersey. The audience at the Dana Centre will watch surgery, whilst a facilitator will be on hand to explain procedures and answer questions.


Projector screens and state-of-the-art telecommunications systems will link the medical professionals in the states with audience members at the Dana Centre throughout the surgery. From how tumours form to whether the brain feels pain, audiences can quiz the medical team as they perform complex neurological surgery. Additionally, medical instruments, machines, and materials used in the approximately two-hour surgery will be available for examination at the Dana Centre.

Dr. Richard Hodosh, who has over 20 years experience as a Neurosurgeon and is Medical Director for the Neuroscience Institute at Overlook Hospital, will be leading the surgery which will take about two hours.

In the event of a complication with the operation, the surgeon is able cut off visuals and sound. “Live from Brainworks offers viewers the unique opportunity to witness actual neurological surgery, as well as ask questions to uncover some of the mysteries of our brains. The surgery will showcase fantastic medical skills and advanced technology including the video feed from the endoscopes,” commented Lisa Jamieson, Programme Developer, Dana Centre.

Why encourage ordinary people to watch surgery? Indeed, why would anyone want to watch? Nancy Butnick, Leader, Program Development Liberty Science Center, will be on-site at the Dana Centre to act as a facilitator.

Butnick explained: “Despite the fact that many people initially express disgust or even fear at the idea of watching surgery, there is in all of us a deep curiosity about our own bodies and how to keep them healthy, and I have found that within moments, audience members are completely absorbed in watching and understanding what is transpiring during the procedure. In fact, out of the over 4,000 people who have watched live surgery here at Liberty Science Center, only two have found it necessary to leave the room!”

Lauren Gildersleve | alfa
Further information:
http://www.nmsi.ac.uk

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Millions through license revenues
27.04.2017 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

nachricht New High-Performance Center Translational Medical Engineering
26.04.2017 | Fraunhofer ITEM

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Making lightweight construction suitable for series production

More and more automobile companies are focusing on body parts made of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). However, manufacturing and repair costs must be further reduced in order to make CFRP more economical in use. Together with the Volkswagen AG and five other partners in the project HolQueSt 3D, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) has developed laser processes for the automatic trimming, drilling and repair of three-dimensional components.

Automated manufacturing processes are the basis for ultimately establishing the series production of CFRP components. In the project HolQueSt 3D, the LZH has...

Im Focus: Wonder material? Novel nanotube structure strengthens thin films for flexible electronics

Reflecting the structure of composites found in nature and the ancient world, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have synthesized thin carbon nanotube (CNT) textiles that exhibit both high electrical conductivity and a level of toughness that is about fifty times higher than copper films, currently used in electronics.

"The structural robustness of thin metal films has significant importance for the reliable operation of smart skin and flexible electronics including...

Im Focus: Deep inside Galaxy M87

The nearby, giant radio galaxy M87 hosts a supermassive black hole (BH) and is well-known for its bright jet dominating the spectrum over ten orders of magnitude in frequency. Due to its proximity, jet prominence, and the large black hole mass, M87 is the best laboratory for investigating the formation, acceleration, and collimation of relativistic jets. A research team led by Silke Britzen from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, has found strong indication for turbulent processes connecting the accretion disk and the jet of that galaxy providing insights into the longstanding problem of the origin of astrophysical jets.

Supermassive black holes form some of the most enigmatic phenomena in astrophysics. Their enormous energy output is supposed to be generated by the...

Im Focus: A Quantum Low Pass for Photons

Physicists in Garching observe novel quantum effect that limits the number of emitted photons.

The probability to find a certain number of photons inside a laser pulse usually corresponds to a classical distribution of independent events, the so-called...

Im Focus: Microprocessors based on a layer of just three atoms

Microprocessors based on atomically thin materials hold the promise of the evolution of traditional processors as well as new applications in the field of flexible electronics. Now, a TU Wien research team led by Thomas Müller has made a breakthrough in this field as part of an ongoing research project.

Two-dimensional materials, or 2D materials for short, are extremely versatile, although – or often more precisely because – they are made up of just one or a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Expert meeting “Health Business Connect” will connect international medical technology companies

20.04.2017 | Event News

Wenn der Computer das Gehirn austrickst

18.04.2017 | Event News

7th International Conference on Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics in Freiburg on April 3-5, 2017

03.04.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Bare bones: Making bones transparent

27.04.2017 | Life Sciences

Study offers new theoretical approach to describing non-equilibrium phase transitions

27.04.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

From volcano's slope, NASA instrument looks sky high and to the future

27.04.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>