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Possibility That Chiropractic Care May Reduce Anxiety Symptoms

05.10.2004


A recent study, published in the Journal of Vertebral Subluxation Research, describes a 19-year old female diagnosed with General Anxiety Disorder (GAD) who suffered from somatic and psychiatric symptoms for two years. After a four-month course of chiropractic care, the young woman reported an 80% reduction in her anxiety symptoms, including a 90% decrease in her headaches. The patient was able to resume a normal lifestyle without resorting to prescription or over-the-counter drugs.



The patient’s previous medical treatment had included multiple emergency room visits; private specialists; and a rotation of drug therapies including Paxil, Xanax, and Celexa -- which all failed to manage her symptoms.

The research was co-authored by Dr. Madeline Behrendt, Associate Editor of JVSR, and Dr. Nathan Olsen, a chiropractor in private practice in Boise, Idaho. The patient’s history included at least three motor vehicle accidents between 1995 and 1997; in one, her head shattered the windshield. The initial chiropractic evaluation detected the presence of spinal distortions, referred to as vertebral subluxations, which can result from trauma. Subluxations may interfere with the integrity of the nervous system and affect mental health.


According to the National Institute of Mental Health, anxiety is the most common mental health illness, affecting more than 19 million Americans ages 18-54. These patients make three to five times more visits to doctors’ offices and emergency rooms and the Anxiety Disorders Association of America reports that direct healthcare costs and lost productivity of these conditions cost more than $42 billion per year.

The drug therapies commonly used in treatment for mental health disorders have recently come under closer scrutiny because of their poor rate of effectiveness and potentially deadly side effects, including increased suicidal tendencies in young people.

Despite this, most consumers are not given information on non-drug options and remain unaware of the benefits and cost savings that complementary and alternative care may offer. “This young woman spent two years in crisis, going from emergency room to private specialist, spending thousands of dollars for tests and drug therapy, without any resolution of her problems. A simple, non-invasive spinal screening ultimately provided the findings that made the difference: her spine was subluxated, impinging on nerves, and altering the proper function of her nervous system,” Behrendt reports. “How many other people are suffering unnecessarily because they are missing the proper screening?”

JVSR is a peer-reviewed scientific journal devoted to subluxation-based chiropractic research affiliated with the World Chiropractic Alliance (WCA), an international organization representing doctors of chiropractic. WCA promotes the traditional, drug-free and non-invasive form of chiropractic as a means of correcting vertebral subluxations that cause nerve interference.

The WCA is a NGO (Non-Governmental Organization) associated with the United Nations Department of Public Information.

| newswise
Further information:
http://www.worldchiropracticalliance.org
http://www.jvsr.com

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