Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Half of patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma are under-treated


Approximately half of patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) fail to receive the recommended dose and schedule of chemotherapy, reducing their chances for remission or cure.

The study of 4,522 patients in 567 oncology practices nationwide, led by the University of Rochester Medical Center, is the largest of its kind to date. Published September 20, 2004 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology (online edition), the study found that 48 to 53 percent of NHL patients received less than 85 percent of the recommended chemotherapy dose intensity due to treatment delays of at least one week or dose reduction.

"The data point to an alarming pattern in the treatment of patients with aggressive and potentially curable NHL: Too many patients do not receive the chemotherapy doses that they need in order to have the best chance of complete remission or cure," said Gary Lyman, M.D., lead researcher on the study and director of health services and outcomes research at the Wilmot Cancer Center at the University of Rochester Medical Center. In December 2003, Lyman presented findings of a similar study of breast cancer patients showing that more than half were under-treated, reducing their chances for remission or cure.

The reasons for under-treatment included both planned and unplanned reductions in treatment. Planned reductions were expected from the beginning of treatment. Unplanned reductions occurred due to treatment complications. For example, a common, potentially serious side effect of chemotherapy treatment is neutropenia, a shortage of infection-fighting white blood cells. Chemotherapy drugs are designed to destroy cancer cells, but unfortunately healthy cells are also killed, including the white blood cells that protect against infection. When a patient’s white blood cell count drops too low, they are at increased risk of developing infections and chemotherapy often has to be delayed until these essential white blood cells are replenished.

While white cell boosters, known as colony-stimulating factors, can be given to manage neutropenia, the study found that only half of patients received this treatment as a preventative measure.

Additionally, the study found that patients over age 60 had more than twice the risk of being under-treated. Other risk factors for under-treatment included having an advanced stage of NHL, poor treatment practices at the treatment facility, and failure to use white cell boosters preventatively.

Other researchers on this study included David C. Dale of University of Washington, Jonathan Friedberg of the University of Rochester Medical Center, Jeffrey Crawford of Duke University, and Richard I. Fisher of the University of Rochester Medical Center. The study was funded by Amgen.

The Awareness of Neutropenia in Chemotherapy (ANC) Study Group, based at the Wilmot Cancer Center at University of Rochester Medical Center, was formed in September 2000 to develop more accurate prediction models for neutropenia. Directed by leading U.S. hematologists and oncologists Lyman, Dale, and Crawford, the group focuses on neutropenia awareness, treatment effectiveness and long-term survival. The group also studies the cost and quality-of-life impacts of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. The ANC Study group is supported by a grant from Amgen.

Elizabeth Searle | EurekAlert!
Further information:

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Inflammation Triggers Unsustainable Immune Response to Chronic Viral Infection
24.10.2016 | Universität Basel

nachricht Resolving the mystery of preeclampsia
21.10.2016 | Universitätsklinikum Magdeburg

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Ice shelf vibrations cause unusual waves in Antarctic atmosphere

25.10.2016 | Earth Sciences

Fluorescent holography: Upending the world of biological imaging

25.10.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Etching Microstructures with Lasers

25.10.2016 | Process Engineering

More VideoLinks >>>