Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New test for kidney disease could reduce dialysis need

13.09.2004


A new non-invasive test for kidney disease, developed by clinicians at Hammersmith Hospitals NHS Trust and Imperial College London, is providing a simple, safe, cheap and reliable method of detecting kidney disease. The new test, reported today in the journal Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, can detect disease before symptoms become apparent, and offers a quicker way of finding out if patients are responding to treatment – which could mean that some patients might not need costly dialysis.



Around 100,000 people in the UK have kidney disease, and the number is increasing, costing the NHS over £2 billion annually. Over 7000 people die from kidney failure every year. “Patients with a progressive kidney disease due to vasculitis* often develop kidney failure, the only treatment for which is dialysis or kidney transplant,” explains Dr Fred Tam, consultant nephrologist at Charing Cross and Hammersmith Hospitals and senior lecturer at Imperial College London. “By looking at a chemical produced when the kidney becomes inflamed, we can test patient’s urine for the level of disease, often before clinical symptoms appear.” The test could eventually replace the need to take biopsies from the kidney – a complicated and uncomfortable surgical procedure.

Current treatments for kidney vasculitis involve using drugs that knock out the body’s immune system. These drugs can cause side effects, including vulnerability to infection and risk of reduced fertility. This new test can accurately measure response to treatment, allowing clinicians to tailor treatments to individual patients. “The test can tell us if a treatment is working, and shows us, before it is too late, if we need to change the medication, without the need to perform a biopsy,” adds Dr Tam.


The test works by identifying the amount of a cytokine molecule called monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) present in the urine. MCP-1 is produced by the body as a response to inflammation, and attracts white blood cells to the area to combat pathogens. However, overreaction of the white blood cells may also cause vasculitis and organ damage. Each test costs less than £20 to administer. Kidney dialysis costs around £29,000 per year for one patient.

Case study

Mr Noureddine Khallouki from North London was admitted to Hammersmith hospital earlier this year suffering from renal vasculitis, and volunteered to take part in trialling the MCP-1 test. “I was happy to help out, as I think it’s important to give something back. Any new developments that reduce the need to take biopsies is a good thing – the procedure is uncomfortable and meant I was unable to move for about 8 hours afterwards in case of bleeding.” The test showed that Mr Khallouki was responding well to treatment and he has since made a full recovery.

Simon Wilde | alfa
Further information:
http://www.hhnt.nhs.uk

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Plasmonic biosensors enable development of new easy-to-use health tests
14.12.2017 | Aalto University

nachricht ASU scientists develop new, rapid pipeline for antimicrobials
14.12.2017 | Arizona State University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Long-lived storage of a photonic qubit for worldwide teleportation

MPQ scientists achieve long storage times for photonic quantum bits which break the lower bound for direct teleportation in a global quantum network.

Concerning the development of quantum memories for the realization of global quantum networks, scientists of the Quantum Dynamics Division led by Professor...

Im Focus: Electromagnetic water cloak eliminates drag and wake

Detailed calculations show water cloaks are feasible with today's technology

Researchers have developed a water cloaking concept based on electromagnetic forces that could eliminate an object's wake, greatly reducing its drag while...

Im Focus: Scientists channel graphene to understand filtration and ion transport into cells

Tiny pores at a cell's entryway act as miniature bouncers, letting in some electrically charged atoms--ions--but blocking others. Operating as exquisitely sensitive filters, these "ion channels" play a critical role in biological functions such as muscle contraction and the firing of brain cells.

To rapidly transport the right ions through the cell membrane, the tiny channels rely on a complex interplay between the ions and surrounding molecules,...

Im Focus: Towards data storage at the single molecule level

The miniaturization of the current technology of storage media is hindered by fundamental limits of quantum mechanics. A new approach consists in using so-called spin-crossover molecules as the smallest possible storage unit. Similar to normal hard drives, these special molecules can save information via their magnetic state. A research team from Kiel University has now managed to successfully place a new class of spin-crossover molecules onto a surface and to improve the molecule’s storage capacity. The storage density of conventional hard drives could therefore theoretically be increased by more than one hundred fold. The study has been published in the scientific journal Nano Letters.

Over the past few years, the building blocks of storage media have gotten ever smaller. But further miniaturization of the current technology is hindered by...

Im Focus: Successful Mechanical Testing of Nanowires

With innovative experiments, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrums Geesthacht and the Technical University Hamburg unravel why tiny metallic structures are extremely strong

Light-weight and simultaneously strong – porous metallic nanomaterials promise interesting applications as, for instance, for future aeroplanes with enhanced...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

See, understand and experience the work of the future

11.12.2017 | Event News

Innovative strategies to tackle parasitic worms

08.12.2017 | Event News

AKL’18: The opportunities and challenges of digitalization in the laser industry

07.12.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Plasmonic biosensors enable development of new easy-to-use health tests

14.12.2017 | Health and Medicine

New type of smart windows use liquid to switch from clear to reflective

14.12.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

BigH1 -- The key histone for male fertility

14.12.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>