Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Cancer survivors’ other medical problems poorly managed

13.09.2004


People who survive cancer are less likely to receive necessary care for a wide range of other non-cancer-related medical problems according to a new study published September 13, 2004 in the online edition of CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The study suggests that a history of cancer may cause health care providers to ignore other chronic medical ailments, such as heart disease, heart failure, diabetes, and lung disease. The abstract of this article will be freely accessible via the CANCER News Room.



Thanks in part to improved survival rates, the number of people in the U.S. with a history of cancer is well over 9.6 million and expected to rise. As cancer survivors grow older, not only do they have to be vigilant about monitoring for relapse, but they are also vulnerable to the same common chronic ailments that afflict aging Americans, such as diabetes, heart disease, strokes, and other cancers.

While previous studies have shown that cancer survivors have more contact with physicians, there is little evidence that this translates into adequate care for non-cancer-related health care diseases. In fact, studies show cancer survivors who see only their primary care doctor are less likely to receive even recommended cancer screening tests.


Craig C. Earle, M.D., M.Sc. and Bridget A. Neville, M.P.H. of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston reviewed data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program to compare Medicare claims from more than 14,000 colon-cancer survivors with a group of healthy controls.

The authors found colorectal cancer survivors were less likely than healthy controls to receive recommended medical care for the management of their chronic diseases. Significantly, outpatient medical conditions were undermanaged and consisted of a broad range of diseases, including stable angina, diabetes, and chronic lung disease. Cancer survivors were also less likely to receive recommended preventive care, such as immunizations or cholesterol screening.

Significantly, patients followed by both a primary care physician and an oncologist received the greatest proportion of recommended care while those only followed by an oncologist received the least recommended non-cancer care.

The authors say there is no good rationale for not providing cancer survivors with appropriate follow up care for many chronic conditions, and conclude their findings "raise the possibility that either a blinding focus on the prior malignancy or nihilism about the prognosis may leave cancer patients’ other medical issues relatively ignored."

David Greenberg | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.interscience.wiley.com/cancer-newsroom
http://www.wiley.com

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Minimising risks of transplants
22.02.2018 | Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

nachricht FAU researchers demonstrate that an oxygen sensor in the body reduces inflammation
22.02.2018 | Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Developing reliable quantum computers

International research team makes important step on the path to solving certification problems

Quantum computers may one day solve algorithmic problems which even the biggest supercomputers today can’t manage. But how do you test a quantum computer to...

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stiffness matters

22.02.2018 | Life Sciences

Magnetic field traces gas and dust swirling around supermassive black hole

22.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

First evidence of surprising ocean warming around Galápagos corals

22.02.2018 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>