Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Dentists find alternative to ’potentially risky’ general anaesthetic

02.09.2004


Dental experts have developed a new sedation procedure which could relieve pressure on hospitals and allow patients to avoid potentially risky general anaesthetics. Clinical trials on more than 600 children with extreme dental problems who would usually attend hospital for a general anaesthetic (GA) for dental treatment, found the new procedure was completely successful in 93 per cent of cases.

Researchers at the UK’s University of Newcastle upon Tyne carried out the Government-funded study at Queensway Anxiety Management Clinic in Billingham, Teesside. The team say the findings suggest the time is right to reform dental services so alternatives to hospital-based GAs for dental procedures can be offered in specialist practices like Queensway.

The results, which are published in the September issue of the academic journal Anaesthesia, showed that giving patients a sedative known as midazolam and a measured amount of two gases with normal local anaesthetic was a viable alternative to a GA for dental procedures.



The children, whose condition or anxiety was too severe to be treated using conventional techniques such as local anaesthetic alone, felt no pain under sedation, and although they remained conscious throughout they did not remember their treatment after it was completed. Not only did they avoid the risks of a general anaesthetic, they were sedated in a dentist’s chair, which suggests the procedure could be used as a way of reducing hospital waiting lists and freeing beds.

GAs for dental procedures have traditionally been used where dentists feel the patient’s care cannot be managed using conventional techniques. The UK Government banned dental surgeries from performing them in January 2002, following several patient deaths, and it transferred responsibility for dental GAs to hospitals.

The Newcastle University clinical trials tested three new sedative procedures on groups of children who had been referred to Queensway Anxiety Management Clinic.

In the group given a combination of nitrous oxide and sevoflurane and intravenous midazolam by a consultant anaesthetist, 249 out of the 267 children – 93 per cent - completed their treatment successfully.

Dr Paul Averley, principal dentist at Queensway Anxiety Management Clinic, who developed the techniques and is working on the programme of research in collaboration with Newcastle University’s School of Dental Sciences and Centre for Health Services Research, said: "Dentists are often suspicious about procedures that involve sedating children with intravenous agents like midazolam. However, we showed that it worked very effectively when combined with inhalation agents and we saw no adverse reactions. "The children were treated by a highly trained team, which included a consultant anaesthetist, and they also had have the benefit of shorter waiting times and treatment in familiar surroundings.

Dr Averley, who qualified as a dentist at Newcastle University in 1990, added: "It’s two years since the Government ban on GDAs in dental practices and we now hope the profession can start to share best practice on evidence-based sedation techniques. Health authorities could consider establishing specialist services throughout the country, together with facilities where teams can be trained to administer the procedures."

Commenting on the significance of this work, Dr Nick Girdler, Head of the Sedation Department at Newcastle Dental Hospital & School, said: "These results are very exciting. The technique gives real hope to children who are too scared to have teeth extracted or filled using standard sedation techniques. "It complements other types of sedation for children, such as nitrous oxide sedation (laughing gas), and newer techniques including oral midazolam sedation (a sedative drink). It is hoped that this research will give children and parents more choice, especially if other specialist dental clinics, with appropriate anaesthetic support, can be set up to offer these services".

Dr Paul Averley | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ncl.ac.uk

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Speed data for the brain’s navigation system
06.12.2016 | Deutsches Zentrum für Neurodegenerative Erkrankungen e.V. (DZNE)

nachricht Study suggests possible new target for treating and preventing Alzheimer's
02.12.2016 | Oregon Health & Science University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Significantly more productivity in USP lasers

In recent years, lasers with ultrashort pulses (USP) down to the femtosecond range have become established on an industrial scale. They could advance some applications with the much-lauded “cold ablation” – if that meant they would then achieve more throughput. A new generation of process engineering that will address this issue in particular will be discussed at the “4th UKP Workshop – Ultrafast Laser Technology” in April 2017.

Even back in the 1990s, scientists were comparing materials processing with nanosecond, picosecond and femtosesecond pulses. The result was surprising:...

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Robot on demand: Mobile machining of aircraft components with high precision

06.12.2016 | Power and Electrical Engineering

A new dead zone in the Indian Ocean could impact future marine nutrient balance

06.12.2016 | Earth Sciences

Significantly more productivity in USP lasers

06.12.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>