Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Can children make their own healthcare decisions?

16.08.2004


When equipped with enough information, some adolescents (ages 13 to 16) can make health care decisions as well as adults.

According to an article published recently in The Journal of Clinical Ethics, "Correlates of Children’s Competence to Make Healthcare Decisions," it’s important to include children in health care decision making as it fosters their developing ability to care for their own health. The article was written by a team of researchers that included Susan B. Dickey, Ph.D., R.N., associate professor of nursing in Temple University’s College of Health Professions. "We are interested in fostering children’s and adolescents’ developing ability to take care of their own health. Parents are equipped differently, from one family to the next, in their capacity to teach their children about good health and health care. It’s just like any form of development – most people can learn to read over time, one learns to take care of one’s body, especially when given opportunities to learn about health," said Dickey.

When possible, it’s best to engage all family members in the decision-making at hand. But sometimes, adolescents may urgently need services for problems they don’t want to share with their parents, such as pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, substance abuse or mental illness. In such cases, mandating parental involvement could jeopardize the health and well being of the adolescent. The researchers measured older children’s (11-12 years) and adolescents’ (13-16 years) ability to make informed decisions about medical treatment. One group of children had had previous experience with the health care system.



"Most striking to us was that when given all of the information, adolescents made decisions similarly to adults, supporting previous research on the issue. The younger subjects, however, were not completely competent to make good health care decisions, although there were trends in the data that suggested that these skills were developing," said Dickey.

Dickey, a board appointed member of the American Nurses Association Advisory Committee on Ethics and Human Rights, is an expert in health care decisions by school-age children and adolescents. She has consulted extensively in cases involving children and health care.

Eryn Jelesiewicz | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.temple.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht World first: Massive thrombosis removed during early pregnancy
20.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

nachricht Therapy of preterm birth in sight?
19.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>