Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

MCG students discover medicinal role for pancake mix

10.08.2004


Chicken liver may seem like an odd component of a medical procedure, but for thousands of patients over the past generation, the cuisine has been doctor’s orders to help diagnose gastrointestinal disorders.



Perhaps not for much longer, though, based on the results of a recent Medical College of Georgia School of Allied Health Sciences student project.

Micah Grant, Woldeab Medhin and Aaron Scott, juniors in the School of Allied Health Sciences’ nuclear medicine technology program, recently were assigned to review and compile scientific data in their field, in which health practitioners use radioactive pharmaceuticals to help assess organ function and diagnose disease. But the students wanted to go a step further and actually contribute to the literature.


The students knew just what their starting point would be: chicken liver.

"To diagnose digestion-related disorders, a radioactive tracer called Tc99m sulfer colloid is injected into chicken liver and fed to the patient," said Mr. Scott, who along with Mr. Grant and Mr. Medhin is earning MCG certification in nuclear medicine technology via distance-learning at the Gwinnett University Center in Lawrenceville, Ga. The tracer goes to the target organ and can then be imaged with a Gamma camera, which takes pictures of the radiation photons emitted by the tracer.

Chicken liver is the delivery agent of choice because its proteins bind with sulfer colloid at a rate of about 92 percent. The radioactive tracer then provides clear pictures of the organ or organs being assessed.

"The problem is that the ’delicacy’ isn’t palatable to many people even under the best of circumstances, and many individuals observe cultural practices that make chicken liver an impossible choice," said Mary Anne Owen, program director of nuclear medicine technology. "The option for a palatable, diagnostically accurate vegetarian meal is a much-needed alternative."

Options such as grits and oatmeal have been used, but with much less reliable results because their binding rate is so much lower, Mr. Scott said. He and his classmates rose to the challenge when an Emory University radiologist, Dr. Rahguueer Halkar, asked them to help him find a vegetarian food with a high-enough binding rate to use it as a reliable substitute for chicken liver.

The students knew they were looking for a food high in protein, but other than that, they anticipated a largely trial-and-error search. Incredibly, they found what they were looking for on their first try.

"We thought we might actually have to develop a product, but we found what we were looking for right on the grocery store shelf," Mr. Scott said.

The product, Carborite Pancake Mix by the company, Carbolite, produces soy-based pancakes when mixed with water.

"We followed the product directions, then mixed it with sulfer colloid and made the pancakes on the griddle," said Mr. Scott. "Sulfer colloid is tasteless, odorless and colorless, so it doesn’t affect the taste of the pancake."

But does it bind effectively enough to produce clear images of organs? Yes.

"We found that the binding rate is 97 to 98 percent--higher than that of chicken liver," Mr. Scott said. He will present the findings at the Southeast Chapter of the Society of Nuclear Medicine annual meeting Sept. 9-12 in Clearwater, Fla. He and his classmates also plan to test their product on volunteer gastric patients, using the pancake for the first test, then repeating the test two days later with chicken liver and comparing the results.

"This better, and better-tasting, alternative could have global implications," Mr. Scott said.

Ms. Owen said the project reflects not only the students’ initiative but the importance of the department’s emphasis on research. "MCG’s undergraduate nuclear medicine technology program matches students with mentors from MCG and Emory University, adding a much-needed research component not generally available within the entry-level nuclear medicine curriculum," she said. "This is a wonderful example of our students taking full advantage of the resources we make available and actually improving patient care in the process."

Christine Hurley Deriso | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.mcg.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Organ-on-a-chip mimics heart's biomechanical properties
23.02.2017 | Vanderbilt University

nachricht Researchers identify cause of hereditary skeletal muscle disorder
22.02.2017 | Klinikum der Universität München

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>