Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Recommendation Against Chemotherapy Sensitivity, Resistance Assays

04.08.2004


A new technology assessment from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) states that the use of chemotherapy sensitivity and resistance assays (CSRAs) to select chemotherapeutic agents for cancer patients should not be undertaken outside of the clinical trial setting.

CSRAs are an in-vitro laboratory analysis used to help determine whether a specific chemotherapy regimen might inhibit tumor growth in a specific patient. This type of analysis contrasts with so-called empiric therapy, where chemotherapy treatment is chosen based on clinical literature describing outcomes achieved through a specific clinical trial.

ASCO underscores that the idea of tailoring treatment to individual patients – using effective agents while sparing unnecessary ones – has obvious and great appeal, but ultimately found that limitations in the literature about CSRAs, including small sample sizes, a lack of prospective studies, low yield of assays, and newer chemotherapy drugs that continue to be developed, cast doubt as to their actual effectiveness of CSRAs in determining a course of treatment.



Furthermore, for technically challenging assays that require colony formation, such as the human tumor cloning assay, and for surgical procedures including the sub-renal capsule assay, the success rate of the CSRA procedure is modest. In addition, preparation of the assay may involve complex laboratory work, limiting a broad application of the technology to routine clinical practice.

“I was glad to see that our technology assessment felt that clinical trial work on the use of chemotherapy and resistance assays should continue,” said Daniel Von Hoff, MD, FACP, Director of Arizona Health Science Center Cancer Therapeutics Program and Professor in the Department of Medicine, Molecular and Cellular Biology and Pathology, at The University of Arizona College of Medicine. “Obviously there is a great need for these assays particularly with the more targeted therapeutic agents that are being developed.”

ASCO recommends that oncologists instead make chemotherapy treatment recommendations based on published reports of clinical trials and a patient’s health status and treatment preferences.

ASCO does recommend that research into the potential for using CSRAs as a tool for determining appropriate treatment should continue. “As laboratory procedures become more advanced, better assays will be developed,” said Deborah Schrag, MD, a medical oncologist and member of the Health Outcomes Research Group at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City. “In addition, as more chemotherapy drugs become available, and treatment choices for oncologists become more complex, the rationale for developing CSRAs becomes more persuasive.”

ASCO defines a technology assessment as a process for determining whether a procedure is appropriate for broad-based use in clinical practices. Of an initial review of more than 1,100 articles, the ASCO Working Group found 12 articles that were relevant to include in a technology assessment of CSRAs and analyzed their results.

ASCO also released a new evidence-based technology assessment, Chemotherapy Sensitivity and Resistance Assays, the patient version of the clinical practice recommendations.

“American Society of Clinical Oncology Technology Assessment: Chemotherapy Sensitivity and Resistance Assays.” D. Schrag, MD, et al, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY.

The guideline has been published ahead of print August 2, 2004, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology (JCO), the semi-monthly peer-reviewed journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the world’s leading professional society representing physicians who treat people with cancer.

| newswise
Further information:
http://www.asco.org
http://www.plwc.org
http://www.jco.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht World first: Massive thrombosis removed during early pregnancy
20.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

nachricht Therapy of preterm birth in sight?
19.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

Im Focus: On the way to a biological alternative

A bacterial enzyme enables reactions that open up alternatives to key industrial chemical processes

The research team of Prof. Dr. Oliver Einsle at the University of Freiburg's Institute of Biochemistry has long been exploring the functioning of nitrogenase....

Im Focus: The 1 trillion tonne iceberg

Larsen C Ice Shelf rift finally breaks through

A one trillion tonne iceberg - one of the biggest ever recorded -- has calved away from the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, after a rift in the ice,...

Im Focus: Laser-cooled ions contribute to better understanding of friction

Physics supports biology: Researchers from PTB have developed a model system to investigate friction phenomena with atomic precision

Friction: what you want from car brakes, otherwise rather a nuisance. In any case, it is useful to know as precisely as possible how friction phenomena arise –...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

The technology with a feel for feelings

12.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA looks to solar eclipse to help understand Earth's energy system

21.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

Stanford researchers develop a new type of soft, growing robot

21.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Vortex photons from electrons in circular motion

21.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>