Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Adding Omega-3s To Food No Simple Task

27.07.2004


As the health benefits of omega-3 fatty acids reach the awareness of consumers eager to improve the functions of their body—from the cardiovascular system to the brain—food makers are scurrying to enrich and fortify products with omega-3s and get them to market. But one major obstacle tempers progress—flavor.



Great sources for omega-3s are fish oils, algal oils and linseed oil. Each can be highly susceptible to oxidation, however. That deteriorates flavor, increases the risk of rancidity and reduces shelf-life.

“Many food companies still don’t believe that fish oils can be put in food and that it can still taste good, but there are methods,” said Ian Newton of Ceres Consulting in Canada.


Proper handling techniques and special fortification can remedy these hurdles in many cases, and research is moving forward to find more flavorful fortification techniques.

Speaking recently at the Institute of Food Technologists Annual Meeting and Food Expo, the world’s largest annual food science and ingredient convention, scientists described one problem in omega-3 fortification is the compounds that serve as efficient antioxidants can, conversely, increase oxidation in complex food systems.

In a case study of omega-3 fatty acids in mayonnaise, researchers with the Danish Institute for Fisheries Research found that the dressing’s low pH, combined with high iron content—caused by egg yolks in mayonnaise—are main factors that cause lipid oxidation. They suggested that flavor could perhaps be improved with lower iron levels.

Studies by the same team on the flavor quality of milk that had been fortified showed that flavor improved dramatically when rapeseed oil was used as the source of omega 3s.

Copper can be as big a problem as iron in causing oxidation. Newton described a case of omega-3 enriched margarine makers who experienced an increase in the fishy flavor of their product while at the same time its shelf-life decreased.

“Finally, they realized it started when they changed sea salt suppliers. The new sea salt. . .contained just a small level of copper that triggered a large amount of oxidation,” he said

Foods that contain any levels of peroxide will also have oxidation problems, said the researchers.

Retaining the flavor and shelf life of omega-3 fortified foods can be a simple matter of carefully handling products and thoughtful placement of oils in the ingredient stream, said Brian Langdon, of Omega Protein Inc.

Adding omega-3s as close to the end of the ingredient stream as possible is helpful, he reported, with the best time to add is before the final mixing of the product.

According to the panelists, some products that are emerging as the best for omega-3 fortification include frozen food entrees, soups, refrigerated foods, salad dressings, yogurts, spreads, juices, egg products and cheeses, which are especially helpful in providing omega-3s due to their attraction to a wide audience, ranging from children to the elderly.

The Institute of Food Technologists Annual Meeting and Food Expo delivers comprehensive, cutting-edge research and opinion from food science-, technology-, marketing- and business-leaders. Now in it’s 64th year, the IFT Annual Meeting and Food Expo July 12-16 in Las Vegas attracted 19,565 attendees and 950 exhibiting companies.

The 2005 convention is July 16-20 in New Orleans.

| newswise
Further information:
http://www.ift.org

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Oxygen can wake up dormant bacteria for antibiotic attacks
08.12.2016 | Penn State

nachricht NTU scientists build new ultrasound device using 3-D printing technology
07.12.2016 | Nanyang Technological University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Significantly more productivity in USP lasers

In recent years, lasers with ultrashort pulses (USP) down to the femtosecond range have become established on an industrial scale. They could advance some applications with the much-lauded “cold ablation” – if that meant they would then achieve more throughput. A new generation of process engineering that will address this issue in particular will be discussed at the “4th UKP Workshop – Ultrafast Laser Technology” in April 2017.

Even back in the 1990s, scientists were comparing materials processing with nanosecond, picosecond and femtosesecond pulses. The result was surprising:...

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Closing the carbon loop

08.12.2016 | Life Sciences

Applicability of dynamic facilitation theory to binary hard disk systems

08.12.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

Scientists track chemical and structural evolution of catalytic nanoparticles in 3-D

08.12.2016 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>