Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

UIC assessing spinal cord stimulator in treatment of chronic pain

04.06.2004


A neurosurgeon at the University of Illinois at Chicago is assessing how well an implanted electronic device that stimulates nerve fibers in the spinal cord relieves chronic pain.



The device, made by Advanced Neuromodulation Systems, is already approved by the Food and Drug Administration, but is undergoing further evaluation at several sites throughout the United States for potential marketing overseas.

"Coping with chronic pain is one of life’s greatest challenges," said Dr. Konstantin Slavin, assistant professor of neurosurgery at the UIC College of Medicine.


More than 50 million Americans suffer from chronic pain, Slavin said, and many of them become partially or totally disabled. "That’s why it is important to identify effective methods for treating intractable pain, and document the extent to which these treatments can improve patients’ quality of life."

Functioning like a cardiac pacemaker, which uses electrical impulses to regulate the heartbeat, the Genesis(TM) Implantable Pulse Generator transmits low-level electrical impulses to the spinal cord to modify pain signals. The electrical impulses alter messages before they reach the brain, replacing the pain signals with what patients describe as a tingling sensation.

The system, which is used to treat chronic pain in the trunk or limbs, consists of a pulse generator and leads. It is implanted during a surgical procedure that can be brief and minimally invasive, depending on the type of leads emplaced.

The leads are positioned in the space above the spinal cord, called the epidural space, with electrodes at the end of the leads in contact with the specific nerve fibers extending from the spinal cord that are the source of the patient’s pain.

The pulse generator is the power source, consisting of a battery and related electronics housed in a single metal container that is about the size of a silver dollar. It is placed just under the skin in a practical location determined by the physician and patient, usually on the abdomen or just below the beltline on the back.

Patients use an external device -- a remote control -- to turn the stimulator on and off. They can increase or decrease the pulse transmitted to the nerve fibers to match their current activity or pain level.

Spinal cord stimulation is not a cure, so it doesn’t usually eliminate all sensations of pain, but it can lessen the intensity of the pain, Slavin said, decreasing the need for medication and allowing patients to resume more normal activities.

The device can be used around the clock, if necessary, or only as needed during the day or night.

A total of 15 patients will be involved in the study at UIC, with up to 50 patients enrolled at five sites nationwide. Before the pulse generator is implanted and again one month, three months and six months after the surgery, participants will be asked to fill out a questionnaire that reviews medical history, pain symptoms and characteristics, pain location and quality of life.

Patients interested in obtaining more information about the study may call 800-597-5970 and ask for the research division.

Sharon Butler | UIC
Further information:
http://www.uic.edu/depts/mcam/

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Observing the cell's protein factories during self-assembly
15.06.2018 | Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin

nachricht Scientists unravel molecular mechanisms of Parkinson's disease
13.06.2018 | The Francis Crick Institute

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: AchemAsia 2019 will take place in Shanghai

Moving into its fourth decade, AchemAsia is setting out for new horizons: The International Expo and Innovation Forum for Sustainable Chemical Production will take place from 21-23 May 2019 in Shanghai, China. With an updated event profile, the eleventh edition focusses on topics that are especially relevant for the Chinese process industry, putting a strong emphasis on sustainability and innovation.

Founded in 1989 as a spin-off of ACHEMA to cater to the needs of China’s then developing industry, AchemAsia has since grown into a platform where the latest...

Im Focus: First real-time test of Li-Fi utilization for the industrial Internet of Things

The BMBF-funded OWICELLS project was successfully completed with a final presentation at the BMW plant in Munich. The presentation demonstrated a Li-Fi communication with a mobile robot, while the robot carried out usual production processes (welding, moving and testing parts) in a 5x5m² production cell. The robust, optical wireless transmission is based on spatial diversity; in other words, data is sent and received simultaneously by several LEDs and several photodiodes. The system can transmit data at more than 100 Mbit/s and five milliseconds latency.

Modern production technologies in the automobile industry must become more flexible in order to fulfil individual customer requirements.

Im Focus: Sharp images with flexible fibers

An international team of scientists has discovered a new way to transfer image information through multimodal fibers with almost no distortion - even if the fiber is bent. The results of the study, to which scientist from the Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology Jena (Leibniz IPHT) contributed, were published on 6thJune in the highly-cited journal Physical Review Letters.

Endoscopes allow doctors to see into a patient’s body like through a keyhole. Typically, the images are transmitted via a bundle of several hundreds of optical...

Im Focus: Photoexcited graphene puzzle solved

A boost for graphene-based light detectors

Light detection and control lies at the heart of many modern device applications, such as smartphone cameras. Using graphene as a light-sensitive material for...

Im Focus: Water is not the same as water

Water molecules exist in two different forms with almost identical physical properties. For the first time, researchers have succeeded in separating the two forms to show that they can exhibit different chemical reactivities. These results were reported by researchers from the University of Basel and their colleagues in Hamburg in the scientific journal Nature Communications.

From a chemical perspective, water is a molecule in which a single oxygen atom is linked to two hydrogen atoms. It is less well known that water exists in two...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Munich conference on asteroid detection, tracking and defense

13.06.2018 | Event News

2nd International Baltic Earth Conference in Denmark: “The Baltic Sea region in Transition”

08.06.2018 | Event News

ISEKI_Food 2018: Conference with Holistic View of Food Production

05.06.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Novel method for investigating pore geometry in rocks

18.06.2018 | Earth Sciences

Diamond watch components

18.06.2018 | Process Engineering

New type of photosynthesis discovered

18.06.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>