Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Northwestern Memorial tests ’pacemaker’ for stomach

29.04.2004


Northwestern Memorial Hospital is one of only eight sites nationally and the only in Chicago to participate in a research study to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of the Implantable Gastric Stimulation (IGS) – a "pacemaker" for the stomach that may create a sense of fullness. The IGS, which essentially looks and operates very similar to a typical cardiac pacemaker, will be tested to see if it is a safer, less invasive alternative to other surgical treatments for weight loss.



Manufactured by Transneuronix, this system consists of an electrical pulse generator, about the size of a pocket watch, which is placed under the skin in the abdomen and connected to the wall of the stomach with two wires. The pulse generator delivers electrical stimulation to the stomach, causing the feeling of fullness. Implanting it takes less than an hour and is done as an outpatient laparoscopic procedure.

"Surgeons are still unsure exactly why it lessens the appetite," explains Robert Kushner, M.D., medical director of the Wellness Institute at Northwestern Memorial Hospital and professor of medicine at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. "Possible mechanisms of action include an impact on the nerves, changes in digestive hormones or direct stimulation of stomach muscles."


Clinical data have been collected on about 450 subjects worldwide. "The IGS system, unlike most operations that treat obesity, does not alter gastrointestinal anatomy and is being tested to see if it is less invasive and results in fewer complications compared to other surgical procedures," adds Jay B. Prystowsky, M.D., chief of the Division of Gastrointestinal and Endocrine Surgery at Northwestern Memorial Hospital and professor of surgery at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine.

The electronic pulse generator is operated by a programmer – or hand-held computer – that uses radio waves and programming software to communicate with the implanted study device from outside the body, like a remote control. The programmer can change the type of electrical signals delivered to the stomach.

Once implanted in study participants, the study device will be tested using the programmer and then immediately turned off. Fourteen days after the operation, participants will blindly be randomized into one of two groups: those who have the device turned on and those who do not.

"This device is not intended to be used at the exclusion of well-guided lifestyle changes," said Julie Roth, M.D., a physician with the Northwestern Memorial Wellness Institute and associate professor of medicine at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine. "All participants will also work closely with physicians and dietitians at the Wellness Institute."

One year will mark the conclusion of the first part of this research study and all participants will have the device turned on. Then, researchers will begin the second part of their research, which seeks to determine if the device is safe and effective for use over an extended period of time. "We are facing a worldwide epidemic of obesity," adds Dr. Roth. "More than one billion people are affected by obesity worldwide, and at least 300 million are clinically obese – a key risk factor in type II diabetes, cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure and stroke, as well as a variety of cancers."

"It is extremely difficult for some people to lose weight and sustain their weight loss. This device might be an option for patients who have repeatedly tried to lose weight and failed," said Dr. Kushner.

Doctors hope to enroll approximately 200 participants nationally and Northwestern Memorial is recruiting approximately 30 participants.

Participants may be are eligible for this study if they meet the following requirements:
  • 18 – 65 years old
  • BMI of 35 to 55
  • Documented history of five years of obesity with a failure to achieve and maintain weight loss with non surgical weight control

Interested participants should contact Northwestern Memorial Hospital at 312-926-8400 or visit http://www.candidatescreenings.com/SSSPWelcome.asp.

About the Wellness Institute at Northwestern Memorial Hospital

The Wellness Institute provides an array of services built upon our reputation as a world-class academic medical center, bringing expertise and credibility to individuals who want to adopt a healthy lifestyle. Each person’s history of weight loss attempts, battles with nicotine or troubled relationships with exercise are unique. A staff of lifestyle medicine experts form a partnership with patients to help set and achieve specific goals.

About Northwestern Memorial Hospital

Northwestern Memorial Hospital (NMH) is one of the country’s premier academic medical centers and is the primary teaching hospital of Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine where this research was funded. Northwestern Memorial and its Prentice Women’s Hospital and Stone Institute of Psychiatry have 744 beds and more than 1,200 affiliated physicians and 5,000 employees. Providing state-of-the-art care, NMH is recognized for its outstanding clinical and surgical advancements in such areas as cardiothoracic and vascular care, gastroenterology, neurology and neurosurgery, oncology, organ and bone marrow transplantation, and women’s health.

Northwestern Memorial was ranked as the nation’s 5th best hospital by the 2002 Consumer Checkbook survey of the nation’s physicians and is listed in the majority of specialties in this year’s US News & World Report’s issue of “America’s Best Hospitals.” NMH is also cited as one of the “100 Best Companies for Working Mothers” by Working Mother magazine and has been chosen by Chicagoans year after year as their “most preferred hospital” in National Research Corporation’s annual survey.

Patty Keiler | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.candidatescreenings.com/SSSPWelcome.asp
http://www.nmh.org/

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Serious children’s infections also spreading in Switzerland
26.07.2017 | Universitätsspital Bern

nachricht New vaccine production could improve flu shot accuracy
25.07.2017 | Duke University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

Im Focus: Manipulating Electron Spins Without Loss of Information

Physicists have developed a new technique that uses electrical voltages to control the electron spin on a chip. The newly-developed method provides protection from spin decay, meaning that the contained information can be maintained and transmitted over comparatively large distances, as has been demonstrated by a team from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute. The results have been published in Physical Review X.

For several years, researchers have been trying to use the spin of an electron to store and transmit information. The spin of each electron is always coupled...

Im Focus: The proton precisely weighted

What is the mass of a proton? Scientists from Germany and Japan successfully did an important step towards the most exact knowledge of this fundamental constant. By means of precision measurements on a single proton, they could improve the precision by a factor of three and also correct the existing value.

To determine the mass of a single proton still more accurate – a group of physicists led by Klaus Blaum and Sven Sturm of the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

CCNY physicists master unexplored electron property

26.07.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Molecular microscopy illuminates molecular motor motion

26.07.2017 | Life Sciences

Large-Mouthed Fish Was Top Predator After Mass Extinction

26.07.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>