Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New instrument to help fight prostate cancer

26.03.2004


With prostate cancer the second leading cause of cancer deaths in men in many industrialised countries, a new diagnostic instrument offers the possibility of rapid and early warning detection and screening of this major killer.



The three-year IST programme-funded PAMELA project aimed to develop a new analytical instrument that allows very fast blood analysis to determine the presence and amount of prostate specific antigen (PSA) present - important for the follow-up of prostate cancer.

The project’s integrated microbiosensor system incorporated established surface plasmon resonance (SPR) techniques, but significant improvements led to the development of the first commercial imaging instrument called the IBIS iSPR, which has been subsequently commercialised by consortium member Holland Biomaterials Group via its daughter company IBIS Technologies. In the analysis of an organism’s protein complement, proteomics, SPR technology serves as a sensitive instrument to identify and quantify specific binding events to a target molecule and acts as a micro-purification and recovery system to provide material for further analysis.


This new instrument "detects interactions with the binding of bio-molecules, such as proteins and DNA, with the sensors," explains Gerard Engbers, manager of technologies for the project. What makes the IBIS iSPR machine innovative is the number of interactions that can be simultaneously detected. Engbers points out that the number of simultaneous interactions that can be currently done with SPR machines is around 8, while the IBIS iSPR’s high optical resolution of 30 micrometre enables the simultaneous evaluation of more than 15,000 interactions on a single sensor. This gives a daily capacity of more than 2 million analyses per instrument.

The system operates with two monitors, one displaying the real time SPR-image of the sensor and the other for instrument control and presentation of the processed data. Fully dedicated software makes for ease of use, with the clear structure allowing basic operation without thick manuals.

The software provides full control over the interaction measurement, data acquisition, data analysis and also contains sensors modification routines including array spotting. Besides mass screening, the IBIS iSPR is a potential research instrument for every life science research laboratory, and can be used as an analysis instrument for combination with micro structured surfaces such as biochips and micro-arrays for genomic, proteomic and drug discovery applications.

Commercialisation efforts are off to a good start, says Engbers, with five units already sold by IBIS since the production line was launched three months ago. The forecast for this year is 10-15 systems, which cost approximately 96,000 euros each, and between 50 to 70 systems within five years. Engbers says IBIS will sell directly in Holland, Belgium and Germany, while the rest of Europe, Asia and the US will be handled by distributors, which the company is currently seeking.

"Currently the machines are being sold for research purposes - universities, academic hospitals and research labs for large pharmaceutical companies," he says, and for the longer term the company plans to develop dedicated instruments for use in hospitals for diagnostics.

Contact:
Gerhard Engbers
IBIS Technologies
PO Box 1242
7550 BE Hengelo
The Netherlands
Tel: +31 74 256 7045
Fax: +31 74 256 7047
Email: Gerard@ibis-spr.nl

Source: Based on information from PAMELA

Tara Morris | IST Results
Further information:
http://istresults.cordis.lu/index.cfm?section=news&tpl=article&BrowsingType=Features&ID=63223

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht New malaria analysis method reveals disease severity in minutes
14.08.2017 | University of British Columbia

nachricht New type of blood cells work as indicators of autoimmunity
14.08.2017 | Instituto de Medicina Molecular

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Fizzy soda water could be key to clean manufacture of flat wonder material: Graphene

Whether you call it effervescent, fizzy, or sparkling, carbonated water is making a comeback as a beverage. Aside from quenching thirst, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have discovered a new use for these "bubbly" concoctions that will have major impact on the manufacturer of the world's thinnest, flattest, and one most useful materials -- graphene.

As graphene's popularity grows as an advanced "wonder" material, the speed and quality at which it can be manufactured will be paramount. With that in mind,...

Im Focus: Exotic quantum states made from light: Physicists create optical “wells” for a super-photon

Physicists at the University of Bonn have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers. The researchers are now presenting their results in the journal Nature Photonics.

Light particles (photons) occur as tiny, indivisible portions. Many thousands of these light portions can be merged to form a single super-photon if they are...

Im Focus: Circular RNA linked to brain function

For the first time, scientists have shown that circular RNA is linked to brain function. When a RNA molecule called Cdr1as was deleted from the genome of mice, the animals had problems filtering out unnecessary information – like patients suffering from neuropsychiatric disorders.

While hundreds of circular RNAs (circRNAs) are abundant in mammalian brains, one big question has remained unanswered: What are they actually good for? In the...

Im Focus: RAVAN CubeSat measures Earth's outgoing energy

An experimental small satellite has successfully collected and delivered data on a key measurement for predicting changes in Earth's climate.

The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat was launched into low-Earth orbit on Nov. 11, 2016, in order to test new...

Im Focus: Scientists shine new light on the “other high temperature superconductor”

A study led by scientists of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science in Hamburg presents evidence of the coexistence of superconductivity and “charge-density-waves” in compounds of the poorly-studied family of bismuthates. This observation opens up new perspectives for a deeper understanding of the phenomenon of high-temperature superconductivity, a topic which is at the core of condensed matter research since more than 30 years. The paper by Nicoletti et al has been published in the PNAS.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, superconductivity had been observed in some metals at temperatures only a few degrees above the absolute zero (minus...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Call for Papers – ICNFT 2018, 5th International Conference on New Forming Technology

16.08.2017 | Event News

Sustainability is the business model of tomorrow

04.08.2017 | Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

A Map of the Cell’s Power Station

18.08.2017 | Life Sciences

Engineering team images tiny quasicrystals as they form

18.08.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Researchers printed graphene-like materials with inkjet

18.08.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>