Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New Study Reviews Novel Approach To Control Inflammation Using Melanocortin Receptors

04.03.2004


Study Supports Development Potential in Several Therapeutic Areas

Zengen, Inc. announced today that its researchers have discovered that activation of melanocortin receptors (MCR) subtypes MC1R and MC3R could be a novel strategy to control inflammatory disorders.

The findings, "Targeting Melanocortin Receptors as a Novel Strategy to Control Inflammation," appear in the March 2004 issue of Pharmacological Reviews, a publication of the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (ASPET).

"MCR activation causes a collective reduction of the major molecules involved in the inflammatory process," said Anna Catania, M.D., professor of endocrinology, School of Internal Medicine, University of Milan and lead author of the study. "This discovery is significant because it shows that treatment with melanocortin peptides doesn’t abolish the inflammatory response but instead modulates it. An advantage of melanocortins in the treatment of inflammation is that their influences are broad and are not restricted to a specific mediator or chemical pathway."

Recognition and cloning of five melanocortin receptors has greatly improved understanding of peptide-target cell interactions. Preclinical investigations indicate that activation of certain MCR subtypes, primarily MC1R and MC3R, could be useful in treatment of localized and systemic inflammatory disorders. These include: organ transplantation, chronic inflammatory diseases, acute inflammation, inflammation within the brain and neurogenerative disorders, peripheral neuropathies, systemic host reactions, ischemia and reperfusion injury and infections.

"The study results also indicate that certain melanocortin peptides have antimicrobial effects," said James Lipton, Ph.D., chief scientific officer and director of Zengen and study author. "Unlike corticosteroids, melanocortins do not reduce microbial killing activity, but enhance it. We are encouraged by these findings and will continue our research and development efforts in peptide technology."

Zengen’s researchers also conducted a separate study on melanocortin receptors that was published in the February 2004 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology. The study, titled, "Autocrine inhibitory influences of alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone in malignant pleural mesothelioma," showed that activation of express melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) by selective peptides or peptidomimetics might provide a novel strategy to reduce mesothelioma cell proliferation by taking advantage of an endogenous inhibitory circuit based on alpha-Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone ((-MSH), and its receptor MC1R.

About Zengen, Inc.

Founded in 1999, Zengen, Inc. is a biopharmaceutical company focused on discovering, developing and commercializing innovative products to treat and prevent infection and inflammation through application of its proprietary peptide technologies. Zengen is currently conducting Phase I/II clinical trials for CZEN 002, one of the Company’s proprietary peptide molecules, for the treatment of vulvovaginal candidiasis, commonly known as vaginal yeast infection. For more information about Zengen, please visit www.zengen.com.

Kumiko Hakushi | Ruder Finn, Inc.

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Monitoring the heart's mitochondria to predict cardiac arrest?
21.09.2017 | Boston Children's Hospital

nachricht Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex
21.09.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Hirnforschung

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

Im Focus: Fast, convenient & standardized: New lab innovation for automated tissue engineering & drug

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems Holding GmbH about commercial use of a multi-well tissue plate for automated and reliable tissue engineering & drug testing.

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Comet or asteroid? Hubble discovers that a unique object is a binary

21.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Cnidarians remotely control bacteria

21.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Monitoring the heart's mitochondria to predict cardiac arrest?

21.09.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>