Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researchers create lung cancer ’cluster bombs’

30.01.2004


The butcher, the baker, and the candlestick maker may be more famous, but the pharmacist, the engineer, and the doctor may be onto something big.



The latter group has combined resources and knowledge to create a novel way to deliver a new lung cancer treatment. The new system, which uses "nanoparticle cluster bombs," has proven effective in treating cancerous lung cells in vitro (in a petri dish), it was reported today in the International Journal of Pharmaceuticals. The research team from the University of Alberta will conduct in vivo tests (in live specimens) early this year, with plans for clinical trials to follow.

"Based on what we’ve been able to do so far, we have practical hopes that a new lung delivery platform for lung cancer can be established," said Dr. Raimar Loebenberg, a professor of pharmacy at the U of A.


The three researchers - Loebenberg; Dr. Warren Finlay, a U of A mechanical engineering professor; and Dr. Wilson Roa, a U of A oncology professor - have applied for a patent on the lung cancer nanoparticle drug delivery system.

Loebenberg explained that the drug sits in powder form in the inhaler, which is similar to the device that asthmatics use. However, the difference between regular drugs and "nanoparticle cluster bombs," Loebenberg said, comes when the powder arrives in the lungs, where it dissolves into nanoparticles upon contact with moisture in the lung -usually mucous.

Each grain of drug powder contains "a few thousand nanoparticles," Finlay explained. "Once the nanoparticles are active in the lung they have a tremendous advantage over regular drugs, because they are better able to do exactly what we want them to."

The idea is that the nanoparticles can be programmed to escape immune system surveillance like a Trojan Horse, and carry designer drugs that target cancer cells while leaving healthy cells alone.

"This drug and this delivery system have a lot of potential--there are a lot of different things we can do as we’re able to control where and when the nanoparticles release their payload," said Finlay, who also has a patent pending on a new inhaler to go with the nanoparticle drug platform. "This platform system may be just the beginning. We’re looking at a lot of cool things we can do down the road."

"At this point, we’re excited and encouraged about what we’ve done and what we could do in the future," Loebenberg said, adding that the progress is due to the interdisciplinary collaboration between experts in three fields.

"This was not the result of one brain, but three," he said. "At first, when we started working together we didn’t understand each other very well, but now I think we make a pretty good team, and I think we’ve created something that has good potential for a solution to lung cancer."


The researchers can be reached at:
Dr. Warren Finlay 780-492-4707 or warren.finlay@ualberta.ca
Dr. Raimar Loebenbert 780-492-1255 or rloebenberg@pharmacy.ualberta.ca
Dr. Wilson Roa 780-432-8517 or wilsonro@cancerboard.ab.ca

Ryan Smith | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.ualberta.ca/

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Cystic fibrosis alters the structure of mucus in airways
28.06.2017 | University of Iowa Health Care

nachricht Mice provide insight into genetics of autism spectrum disorders
28.06.2017 | University of California - Davis

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Can we see monkeys from space? Emerging technologies to map biodiversity

An international team of scientists has proposed a new multi-disciplinary approach in which an array of new technologies will allow us to map biodiversity and the risks that wildlife is facing at the scale of whole landscapes. The findings are published in Nature Ecology and Evolution. This international research is led by the Kunming Institute of Zoology from China, University of East Anglia, University of Leicester and the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research.

Using a combination of satellite and ground data, the team proposes that it is now possible to map biodiversity with an accuracy that has not been previously...

Im Focus: Climate satellite: Tracking methane with robust laser technology

Heatwaves in the Arctic, longer periods of vegetation in Europe, severe floods in West Africa – starting in 2021, scientists want to explore the emissions of the greenhouse gas methane with the German-French satellite MERLIN. This is made possible by a new robust laser system of the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT in Aachen, which achieves unprecedented measurement accuracy.

Methane is primarily the result of the decomposition of organic matter. The gas has a 25 times greater warming potential than carbon dioxide, but is not as...

Im Focus: How protons move through a fuel cell

Hydrogen is regarded as the energy source of the future: It is produced with solar power and can be used to generate heat and electricity in fuel cells. Empa researchers have now succeeded in decoding the movement of hydrogen ions in crystals – a key step towards more efficient energy conversion in the hydrogen industry of tomorrow.

As charge carriers, electrons and ions play the leading role in electrochemical energy storage devices and converters such as batteries and fuel cells. Proton...

Im Focus: A unique data centre for cosmological simulations

Scientists from the Excellence Cluster Universe at the Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich have establised "Cosmowebportal", a unique data centre for cosmological simulations located at the Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences. The complete results of a series of large hydrodynamical cosmological simulations are available, with data volumes typically exceeding several hundred terabytes. Scientists worldwide can interactively explore these complex simulations via a web interface and directly access the results.

With current telescopes, scientists can observe our Universe’s galaxies and galaxy clusters and their distribution along an invisible cosmic web. From the...

Im Focus: Scientists develop molecular thermometer for contactless measurement using infrared light

Temperature measurements possible even on the smallest scale / Molecular ruby for use in material sciences, biology, and medicine

Chemists at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) in cooperation with researchers of the German Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM)...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Plants are networkers

19.06.2017 | Event News

Digital Survival Training for Executives

13.06.2017 | Event News

Global Learning Council Summit 2017

13.06.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Supersensitive through quantum entanglement

28.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under real ambient pressure conditions

28.06.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Mice provide insight into genetics of autism spectrum disorders

28.06.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>