Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Novel gene therapy delivery uses stem cells that target, attack tumors

09.12.2003


Genetically engineered stem cells can find tumors and then produce biological killing agents right at the cancer site, say researchers at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, who have performed a number of successful "proof of concept" experiments in mice.



Their novel treatment, presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH), may offer the first gene therapy "delivery system" capable of homing in on and then attacking cancer that has metastasized -- wherever it is in a patient’s body. And the stem cells will not be rejected, even if they are not derived from the patient.

The researchers have tested the system in mice with a variety of human cancers, including solid ones such as ovarian, brain, breast cancer, melanoma and even such blood-based cancer as leukemia. "This drug delivery system is attracted to cancer cells no matter what form they are in or where they are," says Michael Andreeff, M.D., Ph.D., professor in the Departments of Blood and Marrow Transplantation and Leukemia. "We believe this to be a major find."


M. D. Anderson has filed patent applications on the system, which uses human mesenchymal progenitor cells (MSC), the body’s natural tissue regenerators. These unspecialized cells can migrate to an injury by responding to signals from the area. There they develop the kind of connective tissue that is needed to repair the wound, and can become any kind of tissue required.

Tumors are "never-healing wounds" which use mesenchymal stem cells to help build up the normal tissue that is needed to support the cancer, says Andreeff. "There is constant remodeling of tissue in tumors," he says. So researchers turned the tables on the cancer, taking advantage of a tumor’s ability to attract the stem cells.

In their novel delivery system, researchers isolate a small quantity of MSC from bone marrow, and greatly expand the quantity of those cells in the lab. They then use a virus to deliver a particular gene into the stem cells. When turned on, this gene will produce an anti-cancer effect. When given back to the patient through an intraveneous injection, the millions of engineered mesenchymal progenitor cells will engraft where the tumor environment is signaling them, and will activate the therapeutic gene.

In the study reported at ASH, the researchers examined whether MSC producing human interferon-beta can inhibit the growth of metastatic tumors in the lungs of mice that do not have a functioning immune system. They used an adenovirus vector to deliver the gene that expresses interferon-beta, which can prevent cell reproduction. Andreeff and his team found that when mice were treated with just four weekly injections, their lifespan doubled, on average. They also discovered that when treated cells were placed under the skin of the mice, there was no effect. "The cells need to be in the immediate environment of the tumor to work," which suggests that normal tissue will not be adversely affected, says Andreeff.

Other studies being reported by Andreeff that used different therapeutic "payloads" found a doubling of survival in mice with one kind of ovarian cancer and a cure rate of 70 percent in mice with a different kind of ovarian tumor. Another study demonstrated that when the gene therapy was injected into the carotid (neck) artery of mice with human brain cancer, the genes incorporated themselves into the cancer, not into normal brain tissue.

Further work suggested the novel therapy may be able to help treat resistant blood cancers. Delivery of the interferon-alpha gene product helped destroy leukemia cells, Andreeff says.

"These results suggest that gene-modified MSC can inhibit the growth of leukemias, metastatic tumors of the lungs, and ovarian and brain tumors," he says. "We will need to optimize the genes that are delivered, but the most important discovery here is that these cells are capable of migrating from the bone marrow or blood circulation into tumors, and suggests this can be developed into a potent therapy."


Contact: Julie Penne, 713-792-0655; jpenne@mdanderson.org
Laura Sussman, 713-792-0655; lsussman@mdanderson.org

Julie Penne | EurekAlert!

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Norovirus evades immune system by hiding out in rare gut cells
12.10.2017 | University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine

nachricht Flexible sensors can detect movement in GI tract
11.10.2017 | Massachusetts Institute of Technology

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Ocean atmosphere rife with microbes

17.10.2017 | Life Sciences

Neutrons observe vitamin B6-dependent enzyme activity useful for drug development

17.10.2017 | Life Sciences

NASA finds newly formed tropical storm lan over open waters

17.10.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>