Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Imaging technique may diagnose breast cancer without biopsy

21.11.2003


A technique that combines high-level magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a new spectroscopic method may result in an accurate, non-invasive way to make breast cancer diagnoses. In this technique, MRI is used to detect breast lumps, while spectroscopy measures molecules known to accumulate in cancer cells.



According to a study in the Nov. 21 online version of the journal Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, researchers at The Cancer Center at the University of Minnesota have developed a magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) method that quantifies breast tissue levels of choline (tCho) compounds, which the study found to be elevated in malignant lesions. Previous investigations of the diagnostic utility of MRS did not quantify tCho levels in breast masses, which limited the ability to differentiate between benign and malignant lumps detected by MRI.

"We found tCho concentrations to be significantly higher in malignancies than in benign lumps and normal breast tissues using this quantitative method," said lead investigator Michael Garwood, Ph.D., professor of radiology and Cancer Center member. "Using high magnetic fields and this spectroscopic technique may produce a powerful way to diagnose breast cancer and to monitor its response to treatment. We hope this technique will eventually be used to avoid unnecessary biopsy."


The application of MRS to breast cancer has unique technical demands. The problem lies in the composition of the breast, whose irregular distribution of fatty and glandular tissue makes it difficult to establish reference points against which to measure tCho levels. This method accounts for these tissue variations, using water as a reference compound and a mathematical approach to help "fit" or see choline levels relative to other compounds. This technique also exploits the increased sensitivity of a high magnetic field MR scanner, available only at a few locations in the world, including the University of Minnesota’s Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR).

So far the study has enrolled 105 subjects and measured tCho levels in normal breast tissue and in benign and malignant lesions. The study remains open to women who have a suspicious breast lump; however, MRI and MRS scanning must occur before a biopsy or surgery on the lump has been performed. To determine the accuracy of the test, tCho concentrations will be compared with the pathologic findings in the excised tissues. Women interested in participating in the study can call 612-273-1944.


Co-authors of this study are Patrick J. Bolan, B.S., Sina Meisamy, M.D., Eva H. Baker, M.D., Ph.D., Joseph Lin, Ph.D., Timothy Emory, M.D., Michael Nelson, M.D., Lenore I. Everson, M.D., and Douglas Yee, M.D.

Brenda Hudson | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.umn.edu/

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Monitoring the heart's mitochondria to predict cardiac arrest?
21.09.2017 | Boston Children's Hospital

nachricht Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex
21.09.2017 | Max-Planck-Institut für Hirnforschung

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Highly precise wiring in the Cerebral Cortex

Our brains house extremely complex neuronal circuits, whose detailed structures are still largely unknown. This is especially true for the so-called cerebral cortex of mammals, where among other things vision, thoughts or spatial orientation are being computed. Here the rules by which nerve cells are connected to each other are only partly understood. A team of scientists around Moritz Helmstaedter at the Frankfiurt Max Planck Institute for Brain Research and Helene Schmidt (Humboldt University in Berlin) have now discovered a surprisingly precise nerve cell connectivity pattern in the part of the cerebral cortex that is responsible for orienting the individual animal or human in space.

The researchers report online in Nature (Schmidt et al., 2017. Axonal synapse sorting in medial entorhinal cortex, DOI: 10.1038/nature24005) that synapses in...

Im Focus: Tiny lasers from a gallery of whispers

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a...

Im Focus: Ultrafast snapshots of relaxing electrons in solids

Using ultrafast flashes of laser and x-ray radiation, scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (Garching, Germany) took snapshots of the briefest electron motion inside a solid material to date. The electron motion lasted only 750 billionths of the billionth of a second before it fainted, setting a new record of human capability to capture ultrafast processes inside solids!

When x-rays shine onto solid materials or large molecules, an electron is pushed away from its original place near the nucleus of the atom, leaving a hole...

Im Focus: Quantum Sensors Decipher Magnetic Ordering in a New Semiconducting Material

For the first time, physicists have successfully imaged spiral magnetic ordering in a multiferroic material. These materials are considered highly promising candidates for future data storage media. The researchers were able to prove their findings using unique quantum sensors that were developed at Basel University and that can analyze electromagnetic fields on the nanometer scale. The results – obtained by scientists from the University of Basel’s Department of Physics, the Swiss Nanoscience Institute, the University of Montpellier and several laboratories from University Paris-Saclay – were recently published in the journal Nature.

Multiferroics are materials that simultaneously react to electric and magnetic fields. These two properties are rarely found together, and their combined...

Im Focus: Fast, convenient & standardized: New lab innovation for automated tissue engineering & drug

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems Holding GmbH about commercial use of a multi-well tissue plate for automated and reliable tissue engineering & drug testing.

MBM ScienceBridge GmbH successfully negotiated a license agreement between University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) and the biotech company Tissue Systems...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

“Lasers in Composites Symposium” in Aachen – from Science to Application

19.09.2017 | Event News

I-ESA 2018 – Call for Papers

12.09.2017 | Event News

EMBO at Basel Life, a new conference on current and emerging life science research

06.09.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Comet or asteroid? Hubble discovers that a unique object is a binary

21.09.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Cnidarians remotely control bacteria

21.09.2017 | Life Sciences

Monitoring the heart's mitochondria to predict cardiac arrest?

21.09.2017 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>