Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Leading the way in novel anti-cancer research

19.11.2003


Key AstraZeneca data presented at the AACR-NCI-EORTC meeting



New research presented today at an official AACR-NCI-EORTC* press conference highlights the potential of a new approach to fighting cancer -- inhibition of Aurora kinases. The study, carried out by AstraZeneca, represents part of a body of innovative research and discovery work undertaken by the company as part of a broad based development program of novel cancer therapies. Key research presented this week also includes results from a study combining two agents developed by AstraZeneca: an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor and the vascular targeting agent ZD6126.

New frontiers in cancer biology – inhibition of Aurora kinases:


The Aurora kinase family is important in regulating mitosis and cell division. Because these kinases are only expressed in cells that are actively dividing, they could be an important new target in cancer. Aurora kinases are commonly over expressed in breast, colon, pancreas and bladder tumors and this is correlated with poor prognosis in these diseases. AstraZeneca scientists have discovered selective and potent inhibitors of Aurora kinase activity that may have potential application in human cancer treatment. These inhibitors of Aurora kinase are being investigated to ascertain their potential in the treatment of cancer.

"Through cutting-edge research and development, AstraZeneca hopes to achieve a better understanding of Aurora kinases and their regulation, which could in time be a basis for treating or even preventing cancer," said George Blackledge, Vice President, Medical Director of Oncology, AstraZeneca. "This is part of a broad based development program in cell cycle directed therapies."

Leading the way in combining novel anti-cancer approaches:

New pre-clinical research presented at the meeting shows that combining a vascular targeting agent with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor may result in greater anti-tumor activity than either agent alone. These agents attack the tumor by different mechanisms.

Tumor blood vessels differ significantly from normal blood vessels. The endothelial cells which line their vessel walls retain the characteristics of immature, newly formed dividing cells and appear to depend heavily on a tubulin cytoskeleton to maintain their shape. Vascular targeting agents are designed to disrupt this cytoskeleton, causing the endothelial cells to change shape from flat to round, resulting in damage to the blood vessel lining. This causes vessel congestion and cessation of blood flow. The tumor is thus starved of oxygen and nutrients, while its waste products start to build up to toxic levels. As a result, much of the tumor dies.

The potential of ZD6126, a vascular targeting agent, and an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor to work together in combination as a cancer treatment approach was evaluated in preclinical work being presented today at this meeting. Based on the results seen in these models, clinical investigation of this drug combination is about to begin.

Also presented at the meeting, University of Florida medical scientists reported the results of the combination of ZD6126 with another AstraZeneca novel anticancer agent in development known as ZD6474, an anti-angiogenesis agent. Anti-angiogenesis agents being developed by AstraZeneca are designed to block the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling pathway. This pathway is a critical step in angiogenesis, the process by which tumors stimulate the formation of new blood vessels. Based on results from preclinical studies, clinical investigations of the combination of vascular targeting agents and anti-angiogenesis agents are planned.

Other novel approaches:

AstraZeneca has a broad portfolio of novel cancer agents in early development for the potential treatment of a wide range of tumors. New pre-clinical data on several AstraZeneca novel agents have been presented at the AACR/NCI/EORTC meeting in Boston this week:
  • An oral prenylation inhibitor treatment that prevents the activation of a number of growth promoting proteins and thus prevents cancer cells from dividing (proliferating)
  • An orally active Src kinase inhibitor, which reduces the ability of cancer cells to invade normal tissues, preventing tumors from spreading
  • CDK (cyclin dependent kinase) and Aurora kinase inhibitors, which interfere with crucial steps in cell division and inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells

About AstraZeneca:

AstraZeneca is a major international healthcare business engaged in the research, development, manufacture and marketing of prescription pharmaceuticals and the supply of healthcare services. It is one of the top five pharmaceutical companies in the world with healthcare sales of over $17.8 billion and leading positions in sales of gastrointestinal, oncology, cardiovascular, neuroscience and respiratory products. In the United States, AstraZeneca is a $9.3 billion healthcare business with more than 12,000 employees. AstraZeneca is listed in the Dow Jones Sustainability Index (Global and European) as well as the FTSE4Good Index.

For more information about AstraZeneca, please visit www.astrazeneca-us.com

*AACR: American Association for Cancer Research; NCI: National Cancer Institute; EORTC: European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer.

Emily Denney | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.astrazeneca.com/

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht A 'half-hearted' solution to one-sided heart failure
24.11.2017 | Boston Children's Hospital

nachricht New study points the way to therapy for rare cancer that targets the young
22.11.2017 | Rockefeller University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New proton record: Researchers measure magnetic moment with greatest possible precision

High-precision measurement of the g-factor eleven times more precise than before / Results indicate a strong similarity between protons and antiprotons

The magnetic moment of an individual proton is inconceivably small, but can still be quantified. The basis for undertaking this measurement was laid over ten...

Im Focus: Frictional Heat Powers Hydrothermal Activity on Enceladus

Computer simulation shows how the icy moon heats water in a porous rock core

Heat from the friction of rocks caused by tidal forces could be the “engine” for the hydrothermal activity on Saturn's moon Enceladus. This presupposes that...

Im Focus: Nanoparticles help with malaria diagnosis – new rapid test in development

The WHO reports an estimated 429,000 malaria deaths each year. The disease mostly affects tropical and subtropical regions and in particular the African continent. The Fraunhofer Institute for Silicate Research ISC teamed up with the Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology IME and the Institute of Tropical Medicine at the University of Tübingen for a new test method to detect malaria parasites in blood. The idea of the research project “NanoFRET” is to develop a highly sensitive and reliable rapid diagnostic test so that patient treatment can begin as early as possible.

Malaria is caused by parasites transmitted by mosquito bite. The most dangerous form of malaria is malaria tropica. Left untreated, it is fatal in most cases....

Im Focus: A “cosmic snake” reveals the structure of remote galaxies

The formation of stars in distant galaxies is still largely unexplored. For the first time, astron-omers at the University of Geneva have now been able to closely observe a star system six billion light-years away. In doing so, they are confirming earlier simulations made by the University of Zurich. One special effect is made possible by the multiple reflections of images that run through the cosmos like a snake.

Today, astronomers have a pretty accurate idea of how stars were formed in the recent cosmic past. But do these laws also apply to older galaxies? For around a...

Im Focus: Visual intelligence is not the same as IQ

Just because someone is smart and well-motivated doesn't mean he or she can learn the visual skills needed to excel at tasks like matching fingerprints, interpreting medical X-rays, keeping track of aircraft on radar displays or forensic face matching.

That is the implication of a new study which shows for the first time that there is a broad range of differences in people's visual ability and that these...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Ecology Across Borders: International conference brings together 1,500 ecologists

15.11.2017 | Event News

Road into laboratory: Users discuss biaxial fatigue-testing for car and truck wheel

15.11.2017 | Event News

#Berlin5GWeek: The right network for Industry 4.0

30.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

IceCube experiment finds Earth can block high-energy particles from nuclear reactions

24.11.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

A 'half-hearted' solution to one-sided heart failure

24.11.2017 | Health and Medicine

Heidelberg Researchers Study Unique Underwater Stalactites

24.11.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>