Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Gas bubbles are taken under control

17.11.2003


The system developed by the Moscow scientists with the financial assistance of the Russian Foundation for Basic Research and the Foundation for Assistance to Small Innovative Enterprises will instantly allow to detect and measure gas micro-bubbles being formed in blood inside the pump oxygenator. A small device which looks like some kind of a bracelet on the arterial line of the pump oxygenator and is connected to the computer will be recording all bubbles, searching for potentially dangerous ones and will ensure the timely opportunity to get rid of them.



A patient on the operating table is exposed to numerous risks, especially if the operation is so complex, that extracorporeal circulation is required. One of the dangers is a risk of embolism by a gas bubble, which may occur in the process of blood circulation in the pump oxygenator. It is not always clear why the gas bubbles originate, but they do almost in all the cases. The smaller ones, less than 10 microns in diameter are not particularly dangerous, as they quite rapidly dissolve by themselves. As for bigger bubbles, they may plug in a vessel like a cork, thus disrupting normal blood circulation and causing very bad problems for the organism.

In order to avoid such consequences, it is necessary to trace all the bubbles formed in a pump oxygenator, detect the biggest ones as the most dangerous and get rid of them. The matter is that it has only been possible so far to apply a qualitative approach to this problem, but the scientists have not had any clue to solving it at the quantitative level - to detect gas bubbles in blood and to determine their number and size. In other words, the scientists were unable to distribute the bubbles by size.


However, this problem can soon be solved due to the effort of the scientists from the Moscow research-and-production company ‘BIOSS’. They developed a special system of detecting micro-bubbles on the arterial line of the pump oxygenator to perform extracorporeal circulation.

It consists of several parts. The core of the device is an electronic unit with the ultrasonic detector, which reminds a bracelet, but is very intelligent. Its action is based on the Doppler effect – the fact that the frequency of oscillation or the radiation wave length is changing when re-echoed from a moving object. Omitting technical details, the essence is that the generator creates a continuous ultrasonic wave, it is reflected from the bubbles and the detector, in its turn, catches the echoed signal.

Then an analog-to-digital converter ‘translates’ the assisted signal into the computer language, making the signal digital and then it is further transmitted to the data processing, storage and display unit. This way it is possible to display at any time a bar chart at the PC screen, showing how many gas bubbles are moving in blood flow inside the pump oxygenator and to evaluate their sizes.

So far, there has been built only one test copy of this remarkable device. The developers are currently testing it on a special calibration test bench. The device was especially developed and built for the purpose of creating gas bubbles of the predetermined size in the liquid imitating blood. First, it was necessary to calibrate the system, and the scientists did not have the standard. They had to develop it separately.

The system successfully underwent the first tests both at the test bench and at the real pump oxygenator. “Our system has demonstrated all the capabilities we expected to get”, said Tengiz Mosidze, the project manager and leading engineer. It quickly records gas bubbles ranging from 10 to 400 microns in diameter and accurately determines their sizes. We still need to perform medical tests. Currently, we are developing the algorithm of the computer program which will allow to analyze the situation and evaluate the probability of embolism. And for the future project we have plans to develop a system capable not only to detect dangerous bubbles in blood, but also to remove them automatically.”

Sergey Komarov | alfa
Further information:
http://www.informnauka.ru

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Electrical 'switch' in brain's capillary network monitors activity and controls blood flow
27.03.2017 | Larner College of Medicine at the University of Vermont

nachricht Laser activated gold pyramids could deliver drugs, DNA into cells without harm
24.03.2017 | Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Big data approach to predict protein structure

27.03.2017 | Life Sciences

Parallel computation provides deeper insight into brain function

27.03.2017 | Life Sciences

Weather extremes: Humans likely influence giant airstreams

27.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>