Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Researchers find role RNA plays in progress of Alzheimer’s disease

11.11.2003


Researchers at Ohio State University have found new clues to how free radicals can contribute to the development of Alzheimer’s disease.


C. Glenn Lin



The study found that oxidation – a type of damage to cells caused by free radicals – can damage certain kinds of messenger RNA in the brain. That damage may be related to Alzheimer’s.

Messenger RNA (or mRNA) is important because it turns DNA’s genetic code into the proteins needed for healthy brain function. But in an Alzheimer’s brain, up to half of the mRNA are damaged by oxidation; these oxidized mRNAs may process proteins abnormally, which may contribute to neuronal death.


“We know that free radicals can damage DNA, but nobody had looked at the effect of free radicals on RNA," said C. Glenn Lin, the study’s lead author and an assistant professor of neuroscience at Ohio State. "When we looked for mRNA in the Alzheimer’s brain, we found significant amounts of oxidized mRNA in the frontal cortex, which is one of the main areas affected by the disease."

The researchers looked at the brains of deceased Alzheimer’s patients and found that only certain kinds of mRNA are susceptible to oxidative damage. There are many, some of which researchers have yet to discover, Lin said.

This is the first study to describe the specific types, or species, of mRNA oxidized in Alzheimer’s disease; until this point, researchers knew that the oxidation of mRNA played a role in Alzheimer’s disease, but they didn’t know which species were at fault.

Lin and Ohio State colleagues Xiu Shan and Hirofumi Tashiro, both with the department of neuroscience, reported their findings on November 10 in New Orleans at the annual Society for Neuroscience conference.

The researchers used tissue taken from the brains of 11 recently deceased Alzheimer’s patients (aged 65 to 86); seven age-matched controls; and two young control subjects (aged 22 and 49). Using a series of biochemical testing methods, they analyzed mRNA content from the hippocampus, frontal cortex and cerebellum of each person’s brain. They were looking for mRNA transcripts – replicas of DNA genetic code – to see if certain transcripts were more susceptible to oxidation.

The researchers also wanted to see if they would find the same level of mRNA oxidation in the brains of the age-matched and young controls to determine whether or not this level of mRNA oxidation was truly unique to Alzheimer’s disease.

Alzheimer’s disease first attacks the hippocampus, virtually destroying its ability to help regulate memory. Damage to the frontal cortex – an area important for cognition – follows. The cerebellum is usually unaffected in Alzheimer’s, Lin said.

The researchers found high levels of oxidative damage in the frontal cortex of only the Alzheimer’s patients’ brains. They also found that only certain mRNA species were oxidized.

"We were somewhat surprised to find that free radical damage wasn’t a random hit in the brain," Lin said. "But many of the oxidized mRNA species were related to genes already known to be associated with Alzheimer’s disease."

This oxidation appears to start early in the disease process, Lin said, and the disease progressively worsens as proteins continue to accumulate.

"Protein aggregation is one of the hallmark features of Alzheimer’s disease," Lin said. "We think that mRNA oxidation and subsequent protein accumulation may strongly interfere with the brain’s normal cellular processes, which may contribute to the onset and progression of Alzheimer’s."

Lin said he hopes that some day researchers will be able to pinpoint the exact kinds of mRNA transcripts that cause protein aggregation.
"That might help us figure out what kind of proteins in the cell go haywire at an early stage of Alzheimer’s," he said. "Then, if we can somehow block that process, perhaps we could reduce the progression of the disease."

The research was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Alzheimer’s Association.


Contact: C. Glenn Lin; (614) 688-5433; Lin.492@osu.edu
Written by Holly Wagner, (614) 292-8310; Wagner.235@osu.edu

Holly Wagner | OSU
Further information:
http://researchnews.osu.edu/archive/sfnad.htm

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Laser activated gold pyramids could deliver drugs, DNA into cells without harm
24.03.2017 | Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences

nachricht What does congenital Zika syndrome look like?
24.03.2017 | University of California - San Diego

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Argon is not the 'dope' for metallic hydrogen

24.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers find unexpected, dust-obscured star formation in distant galaxy

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

Gravitational wave kicks monster black hole out of galactic core

24.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>